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Rvl8 DLP in powder?

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  • Rvl8 DLP in powder?

    Hi, I have just started using skiboards, namely Rvl8 DLPs I got used off marketplace and loving every moment. Completely hooked.

    I'm going to Whistler in a few weeks and I want to skiboard there. After seeing the different boards (rockered, zero camber etc) I'm panicking a little and wondering if I should buy some Blunt XLs. Will I be okay with the DLPs? ​​​

  • #2
    How much do you weigh? How strong are your quads?

    Sent from my SM-S901U using Tapatalk

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Greco View Post
      How much do you weigh? How strong are your quads?

      Sent from my SM-S901U using Tapatalk
      5'9, 190 lb, I do plenty of leg exercises. Deep squats, deep side lunges etc

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      • #4
        While the BluntXL would make deep powder easier you can handle it with DLP if your technique is good and your legs are strong.

        Sent from my SM-S901U using Tapatalk

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        • #5
          Personally, I struggle with DLPs in powder, but they've got the surface area to float. Just watch when entering powder from a groomed area, or landing jumps into powder. The tips like to dive on me. You'll have to keep your weight backseat, and may want to adjust your boot further back in the bindings (and use the front set of mounting holes on the binding) to shift backwards.

          Then again, I've put skier friends on DLPs as their first skiboard experience, and had them love DLPs in powder.

          Spliffs have been my main ride for years with DLPs as an alternate board on hardpack, and I suspect that my technique has been influenced by how forgiving Spliffs are in the soft stuff. Love, love, love my Spliffs in the steep and deep.
          BOARDSLAYER
          Base / Edge Destruction X X
          Cores Snapped X X X

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Steeps View Post
            Personally, I struggle with DLPs in powder, but they've got the surface area to float. Just watch when entering powder from a groomed area, or landing jumps into powder. The tips like to dive on me. You'll have to keep your weight backseat, and may want to adjust your boot further back in the bindings (and use the front set of mounting holes on the binding) to shift backwards.

            Then again, I've put skier friends on DLPs as their first skiboard experience, and had them love DLPs in powder.

            Spliffs have been my main ride for years with DLPs as an alternate board on hardpack, and I suspect that my technique has been influenced by how forgiving Spliffs are in the soft stuff. Love, love, love my Spliffs in the steep and deep.
            Appreciate the input. Where I am now the ski hills are all hard pack but even worse considering the winter we've been having. So I have no frame of reference for powder. I'll get something floatier.

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            • #7
              I think, you can make nearly any Skiboard work in Powder. For me, it is easier on steep terrain. The challenge on flat terrain is to keep the balance. I find it very helpful to keep my hands on behind my back and actively pull my toes upward.

              Looking at the Specs table of Skiboardsonline.com, the DLP scores 6 out of 10 for Powder. The Blunt XL scores a 10 out of 10 for powder.

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              • #8
                I'll second the opinion that steep slopes help a lot. With a wider board, you're basically just surfing on your tails, and even narrow boards are workable to some degree. I've dropped a powder run on Truth* with Salomon Snowblades for a laugh. Wasn't as fun as my Spliffs, but it worked.

                *one of the notorious hike-in T1 North trio of Truth, Dare and Consequence at Kicking Horse. It's a solid KH double-black, and longer than you'll get on the other ridges, but not as terrifying as it looks from the gondy.
                BOARDSLAYER
                Base / Edge Destruction X X
                Cores Snapped X X X

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                • #9
                  Agree with what others have said, You can make most boards "work" in powder for sure, its just about adapting your riding style. I rode DLPs on pretty much everything for several seasons and a set of 105 Trees ( First editions Which I loved)!!. And I love to be off through the trees or deep stuff. HOWEVER..... When I bought my Condors ..

                  GAME CHANGER.... I've been skiboarding for nearly 25 years, always hoping for a "One board does all"! Although initially buying the Condors for deep stuff, I've found myself more and more using them in all conditions! But when there's deeper snow, those sneaky little pockets to catch you out on or you might nip off the piste for some Trees or side country..... Condors are the Bomb for me! I currently have my second pair of NON ROCKERED Condors, which are my go to board for nearly all conditions! I used to change to My DLPs when it was more icy and compacted, but the longer I continued with my Condors my riding adapted and now I feel equally as controlled as when on my DLPs. And as STEEPS said, its the moving from groomed to deeps, the CONDORS for me carry me through every time with their extra float! Head off the piste into powder stashes... No issues!

                  I can't comment on the BLUNTS as never rode them. But everything I read on reviews etc, they seem excellent! And seem similar to condors... ? Although someone who has experience with both might disagree!

                  I am planning a pair of Rockered Condors for next season, purely for Back country treks and Freeride days!

                  I Ride soft Boot Binding - Burton X - Drive (Boots)!
                  J J
                  United Kingdom

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