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Touring skis vs skiboards in the backcountry

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  • #16
    I wanted to add to this great thread some thoughts about machine insert mounted RVL8 110 and below skiboards and their unique advantages. I have found that modifying existing unique RVL8 non release skiboard bindings that are used on these 110 cm and below boards is easily done and allows skiboard unique solutions to backcountry touring . Skiboards are not just mini skis and the 110 cm and below skiboards have been long used with non release bindings rather then safety release bindings . Yes there are injuries on non release skiboards but there are also injuries on release equipped long skis as well. One advantage of the 110cm and below skiboards is the shorter lever arm of the front and the back of the ski on the lower leg and knee and the ease with which an experienced rider can fall and get this boards untrapped by rolling out of a fall as opposed to a rider in a long ski. Once you accept the use of non release bindings on these 110 cm and below skiboards then it opens up some very unique solutions to mounting these boards with existing non release binding options modified for touring . The great thing about the RVL8 line is that it has some really great 110cm and below skiboards that really compare IMHO with the longboard skiboards in utility in the backcountry. In particular I am thinking about the super wide bodied skiboards like the Condor , Rockered Condor, Spliff, Blunt Xl , KTP and even the Blunts. As I have toured this season , many backcountry snowboarders and skiers look at my Custom Receptor binding with a Tech toe and a telemark lever on the heel mounted on the super wide Condors and can understand that this is really a very unique solution to backcountry riding ! Many folks are really surprised at how much float and speed I have on the downhill on such small boards. This solution really combines the ease of climbing on a short gliding snowshoe like size board with uber competent downhill boards . Really pocket rockets for both the up and the down ! Having spent over 30 years in the backcountry on leather boots and metal edged cross country skis, alpine touring equipped long skis, telemark equipped long skis , and even using approach skis with a telemark monoboard (teleboard) , I can truly say that my current set up is the best compromise of ease on the uphill and cross country travel with ease and control and fun on the downhill in all backcountry conditions the mountain can throw at me !
    Here is my review of the backcountry skiboard options on the RVL8 boards with links that explain in detail how to modify RVL8 bindings for backcountry use.
    ​​​​​​https://forums.skiboardsonline.com/f...tions-a-review
    Boards :
    Blunt Xl, DLP, Spliff, Condor, Rockered Condor , Slingshot, Sherpa, Icelantic Shaman
    Boots
    K2 BFC 100 Grip walk sole , Dynafit CR Radical AT boot, Ride Insano Snowboard boots
    Bindings:
    Zero Pro Non release Binding
    Modified Receptor Backcountry Bindings (Bill Version and Slow Version)
    Spruce Riser with Attack 14 GW /AT binding
    Custom Risers with Fritschi Backcountry Bindings (Jeff Singer version 1, Bill version)
    Rocker and Sbol Soft Boot Bindings.

    Comment


    • #17
      Thanks for all the effort you've put into consolidating and sharing all this experience. I've been watching this for several years. But, the cost of touring bindings and boots has been a showstopper for only a couple days use per year.

      Those OG skins and Skeats along with these snowboard boot bindings https://www.skiboardsonline.com/p/sn...dbindings.html will make a game changer price point. I already have plenty of extra boards and snowboard boots.

      Comment


      • #18
        I saw this post on Newschoolers , reposted on the Skiboard Connection facebook page. It is a great article from a skier about why skboards rule in the backcountry. In his case he is rocking 108cm rockered swallow tailed skiboards 110 cm underfoot with tech bindings. I think the Condor series are even bigger. This season I have been riding mine with custom tech bindings This guy is doing real big consequence backcountry and ski mountaineering lines on skiboards and is not looking back . Really interesting reading .
        https://www.newschoolers.com/news/re...JIye9PjBmWgEVE
        Boards :
        Blunt Xl, DLP, Spliff, Condor, Rockered Condor , Slingshot, Sherpa, Icelantic Shaman
        Boots
        K2 BFC 100 Grip walk sole , Dynafit CR Radical AT boot, Ride Insano Snowboard boots
        Bindings:
        Zero Pro Non release Binding
        Modified Receptor Backcountry Bindings (Bill Version and Slow Version)
        Spruce Riser with Attack 14 GW /AT binding
        Custom Risers with Fritschi Backcountry Bindings (Jeff Singer version 1, Bill version)
        Rocker and Sbol Soft Boot Bindings.

        Comment


        • #19
          tbh, I think we need to look into direct mount for touring skiboards. I don't think the performance that the 4x4 and risers provide makes that much of a difference for touring which is primarily done on softer snow, and on longer skiboards. And not to mention there are frame bindings that offer an incredible amount of flex, and possibly even more flex than the Risers provide, the Tyrolia Ambition is a great example. I'm not a fan of the way Summit has integrated an extremely stiff mounting plate, with incredibly soft tip and tail, a more progressive flex is possible, many skis don't come with metal mounting plates. Its really frustrated me over the last few years, I just want to take my skiboards out touring without having to fabricate something myself, or buy a product i dislike.

          I have a set of Scott Punishers in 173cm, with Look SPX bindings, and on a flex test, they flex more underfoot than spliffs mounted with the risers, even with boots in them, and they dont have metal mounting plate, i dont understand why we cant have this type of constuction in 120 length skiboards, directional flex and shape for touring/backcountry/powder. I'm sure theres enough demand for it.

          I think our limited definition of what skiboards are is limiting design possibilities.
          Fox-Trotting - Thrifty Wanderlust & Adventures

          Skiboard Magazine

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by Roussel View Post
            tbh, I think we need to look into direct mount for touring skiboards. I don't think the performance that the 4x4 and risers provide makes that much of a difference for touring which is primarily done on softer snow, and on longer skiboards. And not to mention there are frame bindings that offer an incredible amount of flex, and possibly even more flex than the Risers provide, the Tyrolia Ambition is a great example. I'm not a fan of the way Summit has integrated an extremely stiff mounting plate, with incredibly soft tip and tail, a more progressive flex is possible, many skis don't come with metal mounting plates. Its really frustrated me over the last few years, I just want to take my skiboards out touring without having to fabricate something myself, or buy a product i dislike.

            I have a set of Scott Punishers in 173cm, with Look SPX bindings, and on a flex test, they flex more underfoot than spliffs mounted with the risers, even with boots in them, and they dont have metal mounting plate, i dont understand why we cant have this type of constuction in 120 length skiboards, directional flex and shape for touring/backcountry/powder. I'm sure theres enough demand for it.

            I think our limited definition of what skiboards are is limiting design possibilities.
            Great post Roussel, . My son ,who has seen me hard at work trying to devise custom touring set ups in the garage, and who uses touring bindings mounted on his long skis has had exactly the same question and wonders why if I like skiboards so much I don't just buy Summit skiboards and drill them with touring bindings? The only thing I am not sure of is whether there is enough demand for backcountry touring mounted skiboards. I do think it is even a more niche market then skiboards for resort riding ! Progressive flex over a short distance in skiboards that still allows direct mounted binding is the question. I have two short boards that can be direct mounted , original Icelantic Scout 143 without binding plate and the Summit Maurauder 125 with the metal binding plate. Both boards are very stiff with no progressive flex and I don't like them much. I have shot an email to Jeff Singer asking his take on your question. I would love a nice progressive flex rockered tip and flat tail wide bodied directional longboard skiboard that could be direct mounted with touring bindings as well !
            Boards :
            Blunt Xl, DLP, Spliff, Condor, Rockered Condor , Slingshot, Sherpa, Icelantic Shaman
            Boots
            K2 BFC 100 Grip walk sole , Dynafit CR Radical AT boot, Ride Insano Snowboard boots
            Bindings:
            Zero Pro Non release Binding
            Modified Receptor Backcountry Bindings (Bill Version and Slow Version)
            Spruce Riser with Attack 14 GW /AT binding
            Custom Risers with Fritschi Backcountry Bindings (Jeff Singer version 1, Bill version)
            Rocker and Sbol Soft Boot Bindings.

            Comment


            • #21
              Now that the Skiboard Connection FB page has over 1000 members, it might be worth holding a poll to see what the interest in a product like this might be? With enough interest you might even be able to crowd fund a project like this.
              Just these, nothing else !

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by jjue View Post

                Great post Roussel, . My son ,who has seen me hard at work trying to devise custom touring set ups in the garage, and who uses touring bindings mounted on his long skis has had exactly the same question and wonders why if I like skiboards so much I don't just buy Summit skiboards and drill them with touring bindings? The only thing I am not sure of is whether there is enough demand for backcountry touring mounted skiboards. I do think it is even a more niche market then skiboards for resort riding ! Progressive flex over a short distance in skiboards that still allows direct mounted binding is the question. I have two short boards that can be direct mounted , original Icelantic Scout 143 without binding plate and the Summit Maurauder 125 with the metal binding plate. Both boards are very stiff with no progressive flex and I don't like them much. I have shot an email to Jeff Singer asking his take on your question. I would love a nice progressive flex rockered tip and flat tail wide bodied directional longboard skiboard that could be direct mounted with touring bindings as well !
                I find the stiffness of the Summit boards unpleasant for downhill. Do far I have not found them better than Spruce for ascending hills.
                Current: '20 Spruce Slingshot 119s, '20 Spruce Crossbow 115s, '18 Spruce Osprey 132s (touring), '21 Rvl8 SII 104s, '21 Summit Invertigos 118s
                Also: '11 Allz Elaila 94s, '12 Rvl8 Rockered Condor 110s, '15 Spruce Osprey 132s , '18 Spruce Crossbow 115s
                Previous: Gaspo Hot Wax 84s, Mantrax 98s, Summit Nomad 99s, Spruce Yellow 120s, Eman Uprise 104s

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by Roussel View Post
                  tbh, I think we need to look into direct mount for touring skiboards. I don't think the performance that the 4x4 and risers provide makes that much of a difference for touring which is primarily done on softer snow, and on longer skiboards. And not to mention there are frame bindings that offer an incredible amount of flex, and possibly even more flex than the Risers provide, the Tyrolia Ambition is a great example. I'm not a fan of the way Summit has integrated an extremely stiff mounting plate, with incredibly soft tip and tail, a more progressive flex is possible, many skis don't come with metal mounting plates. Its really frustrated me over the last few years, I just want to take my skiboards out touring without having to fabricate something myself, or buy a product i dislike.

                  I have a set of Scott Punishers in 173cm, with Look SPX bindings, and on a flex test, they flex more underfoot than spliffs mounted with the risers, even with boots in them, and they dont have metal mounting plate, i dont understand why we cant have this type of constuction in 120 length skiboards, directional flex and shape for touring/backcountry/powder. I'm sure theres enough demand for it.

                  I think our limited definition of what skiboards are is limiting design possibilities.
                  Well said, indeed. Have you tried the Invertigo's? I haven't researched their flex compared to Marauders, but I have Invertigo's on order, with Tyrolia Ambition 12 bindings, and I'm just seeing all this crucial info that I should have seen before ordering, haha. Hoping this combination is going to be rad, with Dalbello Quantum Free 110's (total weight 3.3kg per foot, without counting the skins). Thoughts?

                  *I'm coming from Revolts to the Invertigo's (edit)
                  Rigs as of 2021
                  - Revolt Trees w/ Tyrolia Attack2 13 AT Demo
                  - Invertigo's w/ Tyrolia Ambition 12 AT Demo
                  with Dalbello Quantum Free 110 (fits both rigs)

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    My vote is still for Receptor-compatible binding mounting blocks, or a 4x4 riser that can be custom drilled for different bindings. My main motivation here is to have an easy swap between resort and backcountry riding, without needing to keep a separate set of touring boards (if direct drilled). As previously discussed, boot length might make a Receptor conversion block a bit more tricky, but it would be a good starting platform for RVL8 users.

                    I need to get my butt out to the shops and look for some touring boots soon; that's my biggest barrier to getting into slackcountry and touring at the moment (picked up shovel, beacon, probe last season, in case the hill shut down). Should be able to get a custom plate for bindings made locally if necessary. I'm not totally up on touring gear at the moment, so it's a matter of figuring out bindings I need first, and then bringing it all together.
                    Push the Possible

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