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How do you feel about skiboarding vs. other snowsliding sports

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  • #31
    Skiboards RULE!!

    i took up skiboarding in 1991 or so. had been a skier since 36 yrs old -and not a good one.

    bought 4 pr of Kneissl BigFoots.

    leaned on what was a parabolic edge long before the green rossignols of the day had any sidecut to em at all.

    we got real swell on ice to hardpack to knee high powder.

    eventually went thru a faulty pair of Cannon's that broke - -then Klimax

    finally Line Mike Nick Pros and Jedi's for #1 son.

    now at best of all worlds - - -Line MNPs with Flow Snowboard bindings and Snowboard boots - -

    and i have the confidence that my experience will prove the same as GoHammer92 - -moving from MNPs to Revel8 Rockered Condors will not be hard at all - -Flow bindings and Soft boots will find a beauty home on the RCs in backcountry and powder - -

    the MNPs will be my Baldy Boards - -snow, ice, rocks, mud - baldy has it all - - - powder? - - - not so much!!

    the best part is i can drag my Snowboard up to the mtn and give it a couple hours of fun without switching boots - -

    ahhh the boots on an old man's feet - -lighter and easier to maneuver and less tiring at the end of the day!!!

    JUNIOR SKIBOARDER?? i so wish to be junior again!! shred this - - 63 and feeling younger in my light boots.
    ______________

    i will keep the Line Elizabeth 159 skis for future dreams of Cat Skiing or deep powder in AK and BC- - unless and until the RCs prove to be - -go anywhere in the deepest powder skiboards. Do you think you would get eyes rolling in a snowcat with folks gawking at your skiboards?? i have been cursed at by snowboarders and skiers alike - spit on from the chair and told to get that crap of their mountain - -to which i just jump in off a cornice while they debate the line - -and ski down the tree lined chair on the steepest line on the mountain - - just to show off skiboarding. the worst is when they warn me that i might get injured real bad -- or the very very worst --- they call em Sled Dogs !!!

    BaldyBob

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    • #32
      Man I am so glad we don't have to suffer abuse here in Europe. Yup, RCs go anywhere any time. Welcome to Dad's Army

      Sent from my Nexus 7 using Tapatalk HD
      Crossbow (go to dream board)
      Most everything else over time.
      Go Android

      Comment


      • #33
        Ex-snowboarder

        Around here everyone snowboards. Skiers make up less than 10% of the mountain, so of course, anyone new tries snowboarding since *everyone else does it*, not realizing there's two other devices out there which might be more suitable for them.

        Tried that for five years, and never got the hang of it. Tried skiboarding in 1998 on a pair of Blade77's and figured it out in two runs. Discovered skiboardsonline later and sold all my snowboarding equipment.

        Once rented a set of skis but they felt like strapping two telephone poles to my feet. After two spilling out twice in three runs I returned them. Not going to do skis after that.

        I think most of it comes from being an avid rollerskater, and not a skateboarder or surfer when I was younger. I have some snowboarder friends who tried skiboarding but they had a skateboarding past, and they're not quite as capable on a set of skiboards. I suppose its a natural inclination. Either you ride forward well or sideways well.
        Snow Jam 90TT

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        • #34
          Like apples and oranges!

          I learned to ski on great long straight planks in my late 20s, but never really gained confidence and had a succession of bad accidents that landed me in hospital twice in as many years.

          After that experience I "threw all my toys out of the pram" and sulked for a decade. For physiotherapy I got into cycling, which eventually lead me to return to the mountains on a skibike and from there, back onto ultra short 60cm foot skis.

          I did so well messing around on the foot skis that I tried out Salomon SnowBlades and loved them instantly. At last I could ski parallel effortlessly and put in turns when ever I wanted to. Suddenly any grade of run, including mogulled blacks, was possible. That was almost 3 years ago and I love short skis and would never contemplate long skis, what would be the point? I have no interest in looking "cool" and don't care how "gay" some people judge short skis to be, my delight is heading down tricky sections in control, passing the long skiers floundering about and popping out of their bindings.

          I never really cared for ski poles, I know they have there place in "proper" skiing for turn initiation but I don't miss them and will skate through any flat sections.

          However, it should be noted that I still ride my skibike at least 50% of the time when on holiday. The cross training from the two different disciplines are fantastic and each suits different conditions and terrain. The skibike is brilliant off piste, in deep snow and even slush is great, however it can be very hard work on boiler plate ice. So on a typical day I will ski around in the morning and get the bike out in the afternoon. As I explain to people it is like apples and oranges, you don't have to only consume the one or the other.

          I picked up a pair of pristine Mike Nick Pro skiboards last weekend and immediately took them for a session at SnoZone in Milton Keynes. The riding experience was somewhat different to SnowBlades and it took a while to dial in to the ride. I had bought them for my skibike, but I am very tempted to get another pair for my feet now
          Line XFly - Line Mike Nick - Head Big Easy - Salomon SnowBlades + SkiBikes x 2

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          • #35
            SkiBiker,

            Welcome to the forum. Great story.

            Try your MNPs on your feet on the hardpack, they have great edge hold and are FAST.
            Just these, nothing else !

            Comment


            • #36
              Originally posted by SkiBiker View Post

              I picked up a pair of pristine Mike Nick Pro skiboards last weekend and immediately took them for a session at SnoZone in Milton Keynes. The riding experience was somewhat different to SnowBlades and it took a while to dial in to the ride. I had bought them for my skibike, but I am very tempted to get another pair for my feet now


              Welcome! A couple of us go to SnoZone quite regularly. We should meet up.
              '18 Spruce Crossbow 115 + Spruce Pro Prime risers (Tyrolia Attack 13 bindings) [goto]
              '18 Spruce Osprey 13- + Ambition bindings plate-mounted [touring]

              '15 Spruce Osprey 130 + Ambition bindings + backcountry riser [touring]
              '12 Rockered Condor 110 + Spruce Pro Sport risers

              '14 K2 Pinnacle Boots
              '10 Spruce 120 + Spruce Pro Jr risers
              '13 Eman Uprise 104 + Custom Riser & SP100 bindings
              '11 Allz Elaila 94

              Previous: Gaspo Hot Wax 84s, Mantrax 98s, Summit Nomad 99s, Salomon RS80 boots


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              • #37
                Went on a day bus trip to a hill last spring and it included skis rental. After riding my Codas in the morning, I swithed to 158 long rentals and made a couple of runs. I could not get the skis back to the rental shop fast enough so I could get back on skiboards. I felt like I was on a railway track when on the skis.
                sigpic


                Osprey, Sherpa, Custom Coda 120WT, Custom DS110, Condor (Green), Spliff

                Custom Twist Out duck foot bindings, Bombers (custom duck foot base plate and 3 pads), releasable S810ti on custom duck foot riser

                Nordica N3 NXT ski boots (best so far)


                Wife: 104 SII & 100 Blunt XL with S810ti bindings on custom "adjustable duck foot" risers

                Loaners: 125LE, 105 EMP, 101 KTP, 100 Blunt XL, 98 Slapdash, 88 Blunts

                Comment


                • #38
                  Here to stay.

                  I skied for about 16 years. Most of that time was spent on a pair of Elan SCX Parabolic skis my uncle had bought for me, along with a much longer identical pair for himself. He passed two years ago, and when it came time to re-up on equipment I just couldn't replace my beloved SCX's. I decided they would be the last pair of skis I would ever own, and began the search for something new. Recalling the brief time I had spent on a pair of Salomon "snowblades" years before, I looked into skiboards, and wound up with a pair of Summit 99's equipped with sturdy line 6 bindings.
                  I loved them as a good mid-range/entry pair, and plan on branching out into a longer offering from Revel8 or Spruce Mountain next season.
                  This season I've been able to attack moguls like never before, and have even began to explore the glades for the first time in sixteen years, it turns out my humble local mountain still has a few surprises!
                  Sure there are times that my thighs begin to buckle under the strain of maintaining a wider stance to ensure stability at speed, but I figure I can always take a break from shredding it up on the skiboards and lay down some gentle carves on my Elans.

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    I started out snowboarding and did well in high-end terrain parks concentrating on up to 40 foot tabletops and large spines. However, I lack the ability to spin in the air, so freestyle was not my thing.

                    I gave up snowboarding once I discovered skiboarding, and really loved how it was so easy to descend extremely steep terrain and cliff drops. I became a Big Mountain Skiboarder. Once skibuilding materials showed up online I began making my own Skiboards and was able to advance my abilities to drop larger cliffs, descend faster down extreme steeps and enjoy more agile navigation down extreme steep glades. My biggest focus was cliff dropping (up to 35 feet). I created special powder skiboards for doing that (110cm Tip:175mm M:145mm Tail:165mm). Skiboards have a huge advantage over conventional skis for cliff-dropping. Digging your skiboard heels/tail by leaning back is your way of applying the brakes. This Ďbrakingí isnít physically possible on skis due to the long length from your foot to the tail of the ski. On skiboards, you can can better control your cliff-drop and come to a full stop far better and faster than conventional skis. You need ample space in front of you after landing cliff-drops on conventional skis; you come out of the drop at roaring speed that is hard to stop. I found skiboards to be effective at cliff-dropping up to a maximum of 35 feet even in well forested terrain with very little stopping distance - which would be impossible or extremely unsafe on conventional skis.

                    I also am an expert Big Mountain skier on conventional skis. I do very well on Double Blacks, moderate cliff drops and enjoy zipping moguls. It does burn me up a little when Iím on long skis and see brilliant cliff-dropping opportunities that can only be done with skiboards - so I have to wait a day to skiboard those opportunities. Also, in forested terrain, skiboards offer so much more freedom and fun to zip by trees, especially in dense forests. Long skies canít turn on a dime like skiboards and you are SOL going through dense forests.

                    I view snowriding as a little analogous to golfing with various clubs to get the desired effect. Skiboarding is perfect for steeps, cliff-dropping, glades and everything else of course. Skis (up to 185cm) are great for big mountain skiing. Theyíre especially excellent for skiing moguls. Ski jumping is something I would love to try if presented with the opportunity. Ski jumping skis are fat and up to 270cm in length - designed to get the job done.

                    Possibly the greatest thing about skiboards for me is that Iíve never suffered an injury in the 14 years Iíve been a skiboarder. I think that alone should be held in the highest regard. As a snowboarder I got injured 3 times (broken ankles, wrist sprain) and once on skis (twisted knee sprain).

                    Cheers

                    ____________________________

                    Boards:
                    Build my own Skiboards:
                    110cm Tip:155mm M:125mm Tail:145mm
                    Powder 110cm Tip:175mm M:145mm Tail:165mm

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Chris

                      A very unique and interesting perspective on skiboards. Thanks for sharing.

                      Please post some photos of the skiboards you fabricated. I want to see what that powder board looks like.


                      Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
                      sigpic


                      Osprey, Sherpa, Custom Coda 120WT, Custom DS110, Condor (Green), Spliff

                      Custom Twist Out duck foot bindings, Bombers (custom duck foot base plate and 3 pads), releasable S810ti on custom duck foot riser

                      Nordica N3 NXT ski boots (best so far)


                      Wife: 104 SII & 100 Blunt XL with S810ti bindings on custom "adjustable duck foot" risers

                      Loaners: 125LE, 105 EMP, 101 KTP, 100 Blunt XL, 98 Slapdash, 88 Blunts

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Originally posted by Chris View Post

                        I gave up snowboarding once I discovered skiboarding, and really loved how it was so easy to descend extremely steep terrain and cliff drops.
                        Chris, welcome.

                        With your experience it might be nice to write up a quick guide to dropping cliffs on skiboards for the forum. Stuff like hints, tips, conditions, picking terrain, technique, take offs, landings. I presume it has to different to landing off kickers and moguls?
                        Just these, nothing else !

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Pictures of Skiboards I built

                          These are 2 pairs of skiboards I built. Both are 110cm long, twin tipped and traditional camber. I placed blank DVDs on them for sizing.


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                          The fatter pair are Tip: 167mm M:134 Tail:153mm - built for better powder floatation
                          They are very light weight made with a thick Pine wood core, a plate of sheet metal to help secure bindings, fiberglass, steel edges, no sidewalls and no topsheet. They aren't pretty but ride like a dream.

                          The slimmer pair are Tip: 152mm M: 120mm Tail: 132mm - built for all conditions
                          They are made with a White Oak wood core, a plate of sheet metal to help secure bindings, fiberglass, steel edges, no sidewalls and no topsheet. I chose White Oak for its durability and resistance to moisture.

                          I also built 2 pairs of gigantic skiboards which I didn't bring with me to Whistler. They are best suited to ride dry fluffy powder and wouldn't work well in Whistler's wetter snow. I'll upload pictures of those in about a month. The specs on them are:
                          Length: 110cm Tip: 185mm M: 155mm Tail: 170mm
                          Pine wood core, a plate of sheet metal to help secure bindings, fiberglass, steel edges, no sidewalls and no topsheet. There's other very fat skiboards I've built as well.

                          I use plastic snowblade bindings on all my skiboards.

                          As for cliff-dropping with Skiboards, I'll post some diagrams pretty soon to cover how its done.

                          Cheers

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            Originally posted by Chris View Post

                            I also built 2 pairs of gigantic skiboards which I didn't bring with me to Whistler. They are best suited to ride dry fluffy powder and wouldn't work well in Whistler's wetter snow. I'll upload pictures of those in about a month. The specs on them are:
                            Length: 110cm Tip: 185mm M: 155mm Tail: 170mm
                            Pine wood core, a plate of sheet metal to help secure bindings, fiberglass, steel edges, no sidewalls and no topsheet. There's other very fat skiboards I've built as well.
                            Jesus, these sound like monsters! How do they ride?
                            Do the wide shovels get in the way at all? What about edge transistions with such a wide waist? Any issues for traversing with such a wide board? Ive always wonder why 160-170mm seems to be a limit for skis and skiboard shovel widths, but your boards are blowing these figures right out of the water!
                            Please post some pics and videos!

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              Gigantic skiboards

                              Originally posted by LYK View Post
                              Jesus, these sound like monsters! How do they ride?
                              Do the wide shovels get in the way at all? What about edge transistions with such a wide waist? Any issues for traversing with such a wide board? Ive always wonder why 160-170mm seems to be a limit for skis and skiboard shovel widths, but your boards are blowing these figures right out of the water!
                              Please post some pics and videos!


                              They ride very well in powder offering excellent floatation and more speed than slimmer skiboards. As long as there is even a few inches of powder they are very enjoyable to ride, but the more powder the better. Because they are 155mm underfoot, it takes more effort to ride groomed or icy areas, turning from one edge to the other. So, carving on groomed runs is much more difficult than skinnier skiboards. But, I built them specifically to ride powder only and in nice dry pow they are pure magic. They feel very natural in powder despite how wide they are. I'll post some pics in about a month.

                              Cheers

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                Looking forward to it.

                                If you have some spare time, perhaps you could share some of your board fabrication experience (perhaps on a new thread, to not derail this one too much?), I'm sure there are a few of us who are very interested.

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