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why are my legs so tired?

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  • why are my legs so tired?

    So I took a long time off from skiboarding and went skiing (~160 cm?). I don't remember my quads ever feeling so tired on a mountain before. Almost every run felt like I was on moguls. I could only go for short distances before I'd have to stop to recover.

    I don't think deconditioning could account for 100% of the burning.

    Could any of the following factors be contributing to excessive fatigue?
    • transitioning from 90 cm skiboards to beginner skis
    • boots that maybe weren't tight enough
    • a stiffness differential between skis and skiboards
    • perhaps adopting a more upright posture from having to hold ski poles

  • #2
    Go back to Skiboards!
    rickylink

    ~ KTP ~ Revolts (mucho) ~ ALP/DLP ~ BCP ~ RC's ~ Blunt~ Blunt XL~ Spliff ~ Sticky ii~ Spruce LE /Osprey~ Crossbow ~ Bomber E2 Bindings / RVL8 Receptors
    ~ Full Tilt Boots

    ~ Your 1 ply guy



    Big or Small I Ride them All !

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    • #3
      I have no idea... but I do know that I try and ride my bike at least once a week.. and at least 20 miles... but usually much more often, and longer than that. And fatigued legs has never been an issue. Maybe incorporate a non ski related workout in?

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      • #4
        Were you on familiar boots, that you used for skiiboarding ? Some ski boots are more forward leaning and this might impact your position.

        Ultimately I think it's related to your stance. I used to have the same problems as you when I was learning to ski on actual skis, I couldn't finish the easiest blue run without taking several breaks. My beginner's technique and forward leaning boots were making me use too much muscle force for everything, having me exhausted all the time. Going to skiboards changed everything and the problems went away. Changing my boots on top of that made everything look like child's play. Do yourself a favor and go back to skiboards

        RVL8 Blunt XL
        Spruce Raptors 125LE
        Revel8 2010 Revolt Trees 105cm
        Spruce Yellow/Red 120s

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        • #5
          Exactly how long has it been since you've been on skiboards? Age happens... ; )

          Skis and boot tightness sound like reasonable contributing factors, but I wouldn't worry about it too much... just ride more.
          I always look at the first 8 days of the season or so as conditioning days, and it's usually a few more than that before I can do the mountain top to bottom without stopping.
          Make Skiboarding Sexy Again

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          • #6
            Originally posted by rickylink View Post
            Go back to Skiboards!
            Yep!

            Sent from my P027 using Tapatalk

            Now: 08 Sherpa's (2), Atomic 120's, 2013 125 Protos, 125 LEs, 2014 Sherpas, Osprey protos, 2015 Blunt XL's, 2016 Ospreys, Ethan Too twintip skis,2017 Shredfest One of kind Spliffs, 2018 Crossbows
            Bindings: Spruce Risers and Tyrolia LD12's
            Boots: Full Tilt Booters, Tecnica Agent 110
            History: Atomic shorty's, Sporten, Groove Taxis, Head 94's, ALPs, Spruce 120 Blue boards, Custom Lacroixs, Rocker Condors, 08 Summit 110's, Hagan offlimits 133's, Rossi 130's, 2011 Summit Marauders

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            • #7
              Originally posted by newbie2011 View Post
              Were you on familiar boots, that you used for skiiboarding ? Some ski boots are more forward leaning and this might impact your position.
              Rental boots. My god they smelled so bad.

              My normal boots are Line Transfer boots, which allows you to adjust the forward pitch. Even at the most extreme lean it doesn't really bother my legs.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Steeps View Post
                Exactly how long has it been since you've been on skiboards? Age happens... ; )
                Since 2009, according to a picture I found on my Facebook account?
                Based on my regular activity level, age and fitness could only be negligible factors though.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by rickylink View Post
                  Go back to Skiboards!
                  Believe me, I was not happy that I didn't have my gear with me, and I was even more infuriated when I asked rental shops if they carried skiboards and they were like "What are those? you mean like...snowblades? People don't use those anymore."

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                  • #10
                    I logged in for the first time in a few years, as we actually had a decent winter with snow this year, wondering the same thing and if I should consider going with longer boards instead of shorter. I ride Revolts on icy days and Rockered Condors on powder days though a rockered cambered board like the Spliffs might be more ideal as we always have icy mixed conditions at my local hill. I find I'm always shifting my weight forward or back to maintain balance though I've only ridden twice this season, the legs are certainly feeling the pump a day later, but I've noticed the same even when riding a dozen times especially when switching from different terrain and I may have to stop at least once depending on the area or conditions I'm in. No doubt some of it is my confidence level in thinking I'm going to fall and perhaps overcompensating. I just assumed my leg fatigue was due to the shortness of the board and trying to maintain stability, I even started riding with poles to help in the more technical terrain and to keep me riding more upright, which I think has helped depending on what I'm up to.
                    Boards: RVL*8 '08 Revolt Chicken's, Canon M7 Black, Line Fly 4 post
                    Bindings: Line FF Pro, Groove Red X1
                    Gear: Dalbello CRX Freeride CarveX, Bern Baker Hard Hat, VZ Fishbowl's & Fubar's, Anon Comrade

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Wintergreen View Post

                      Since 2009, according to a picture I found on my Facebook account?
                      Based on my regular activity level, age and fitness could only be negligible factors though.

                      I was teasing a bit... I'm no spring chicken, although I can't say it's hurt my fitness yet. How were conditions? If it was on skiboards, I'd say you were too far backseat (riding in powder does this, too), but on skis that seems less likely.
                      Make Skiboarding Sexy Again

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by zman View Post
                        I logged in for the first time in a few years, as we actually had a decent winter with snow this year, wondering the same thing and if I should consider going with longer boards instead of shorter. I ride Revolts on icy days and Rockered Condors on powder days though a rockered cambered board like the Spliffs might be more ideal as we always have icy mixed conditions at my local hill. I find I'm always shifting my weight forward or back to maintain balance though I've only ridden twice this season, the legs are certainly feeling the pump a day later, but I've noticed the same even when riding a dozen times especially when switching from different terrain and I may have to stop at least once depending on the area or conditions I'm in. No doubt some of it is my confidence level in thinking I'm going to fall and perhaps overcompensating. I just assumed my leg fatigue was due to the shortness of the board and trying to maintain stability, I even started riding with poles to help in the more technical terrain and to keep me riding more upright, which I think has helped depending on what I'm up to.
                        Just saw the other similar thread you just posted on--thanks for bumping that thread back up! I'm now thinking my legs were tired because I was skiing tentatively due to unfamiliar equipment and such a long time off. For me though, I felt like poles were preventing me from riding more aggressively and altering my posture.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Steeps View Post


                          I was teasing a bit... I'm no spring chicken, although I can't say it's hurt my fitness yet. How were conditions? If it was on skiboards, I'd say you were too far backseat (riding in powder does this, too), but on skis that seems less likely.
                          I'm not a great point of reference for conditions. It was 3rd weekend of February in Colorado. There was some decent snowfall earlier in the week. I was confined mostly to greens and blues, so I guess I was mostly on groomed and hard pack with some places under a layer of some powder? I'm not good with the mountain lingo since I didn't grow up in a snow sport culture.

                          Also, the more I think about it, there is truth in the aging thing, but maybe not in how most people might expect. I'm probably more different mentally than physically after 10 years away from mountains. I suppose that much time off has definitely taken some psychological toll that I'll need more than a few day passes to recover from.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Wintergreen View Post
                            I'm not a great point of reference for conditions. It was 3rd weekend of February in Colorado. There was some decent snowfall earlier in the week. I was confined mostly to greens and blues, so I guess I was mostly on groomed and hard pack with some places under a layer of some powder? I'm not good with the mountain lingo since I didn't grow up in a snow sport culture.

                            Also, the more I think about it, there is truth in the aging thing, but maybe not in how most people might expect. I'm probably more different mentally than physically after 10 years away from mountains. I suppose that much time off has definitely taken some psychological toll that I'll need more than a few day passes to recover from.
                            On greens and blues, you should not have felt in any way challenged by the steepness, feel like you're in any major physical danger in case of a fall, so mentally you should have not been too worried, holding back or such. 10 years break would probably make muscles loose some or most of their "ski memory", but I would not blame things on age. I was 15 years younger and 20 times fitter when I was trying skiing, but age and fitness level were not enough to compensate for improper technique...

                            I would still look into the stance you were skiing in. You were on unknown equipment and on skis instead of boards, probably you were somehow like a beginner trying to discover skiing, almost from scratch. Do you remember how easy it was for you to turn ? How much leg and muscle power were you using ? Did it felt like you were pushing harder with the heels and the tails of your skis to turn/brake ? If you're not centered and let gravity do the most work, you will compensate with muscles power which will make them tired, that's what I clearly remember from my skiing days pains


                            RVL8 Blunt XL
                            Spruce Raptors 125LE
                            Revel8 2010 Revolt Trees 105cm
                            Spruce Yellow/Red 120s

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by newbie2011 View Post
                              Did it felt like you were pushing harder with the heels and the tails of your skis to turn/brake ?
                              yess
                              (I need at least 4 characters to post a reply.)

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