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Is skiboarding dying? And how can we save it

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  • #16
    Originally posted by Wookie View Post
    Every time one of these threads rolls around forum members talk about RVL8, Spuce, Summit, etc. as if they are on the same level as Head, K2, etc..

    The "just make rental skiboard bindings and make them available in ski shops" argument is not as simple as it sounds.
    Sorry, but I don't see any suggestions, direct or implied, by anyone that RVL8, Spruce etc are on the "same level" as Head, K2, etc.

    "Make rental skiboard bindings" and "make them available in ski shops" are two different arguments. The first makes the equipment a lot more practical and convenient, even a little cheaper. It is as simple as it sounds - that's already been proven. The second makes the equipment easily acquirable. It is far more difficult than it sounds, and I don't think that's the right strategy today to tackle the accessibility problem.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Wookie View Post
      THEY ARE ALL JUST SKIS .... short or long, fat or skinny, twin tip or directional ....
      I don't think this is really accurate ... I mean it's true at a very high level, they all are sliding devices, but its a ten thousand feets view, it's like saying everything on 4 wheels is a car, including buses, vans, SUVs... Whenever the minis-skis/blades/skiboards discussion arrises, it's down to a differentiating level, where people are interested in specifics, advantages, limitations and such, so it's relevant which category you put things in...

      Originally posted by Wookie View Post
      And, frankly, if you respond to every "Are those mini skis?" question with a "No, asshole! They are skiboards!" attitude you'll never get anyone interested.
      Oh, I might have been misunderstood, my issue is not with people who don't know what these are and call them mini-skis. My argument is not to call them mini-skis ourselves when facing such a question, not out of righteous indignation, but as a way to put the information out there and inform people what these are and why we like them and use them and such




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      • #18
        Funny, I've never really heard them called mini-ski, except maybe by kids. The terms do seem to be somewhat regional, as Aussies will usually call them skiblades and North Americans tend to go with snowblades, and I've heard snow skates from a few people. I don't really mind having them called 'blades' as a slang term and even use it myself with buddies who are used to me ripping around on them. When I get on the gondy with the 2016 Spliffs, I usually try to keep the left-board tip logo visible to the other riders, which very helpfully includes the brand and the world "SKIBOARDS" on it.

        Usually when someone references snowblades, I tell them that this is the real thing (or in the case of my Spliffs, the new generation). Since it's spring now and some actual snowblades have been showing up on the gondola, seeing them side by side really brings it home how different they are.
        Make Skiboarding Sexy Again

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        • #19
          So I don't think skiboarding is dying...

          This finishing my first full season on skiboards (first season on snow in 15 years) I have noticed a lot of questions from the majority. I had only run into one "questionable" comment made by a snowboarder who was quickly shut down when blowing by him on the North Face at Mt. Snow where "those little things" shouldn't go.

          The ridicule, as described on YouTube videos, in my short experience, has really been non-existent. I have been stopped by more people this season asking for more information on them than I have gotten the question "what are those." There seems to be a genuine interest from people after seeing how fun and free skiing they are. I have experienced a lot of comments from some of the older crowd describing how "weighed down" they feel from their skis. They express that these look easy to turn and carve with.

          I wont say skiboarding is dying. I will say skiboarding seems to be at a bit of a building time. I have a feeling within the next few seasons we are going to be seeing a big push in skiboards across the mountains. So everyone keep posting, keep videoing, and keep handing out the cards!
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          • #20
            Here is my perspective from a different part of the world.

            My wife is a snowboarder and my son got really interested in skiing at an early age, so I tried to learn skiing so we can go together. I wasn't enjoying it and it wasnt going well, so I had pretty much given up. I had no idea skiboards existed, as they are not really part of common culture here. But then last winter I was the family driver at a little ski area here called Rila Lakes - there's no resort, just some pistes and is popular for off-piste mainly and draws a younger and hipster crowd. So I noticed many people skiing in these really short skis and it seemed quite effortless. So I googled it, then found a rental where I can get a pair and I learnt to ski in a day. I've done ~40 days since and I saw other people on blades pretty much every time, including in the park, ski instructors, etc. (except when we went to the Dolomites - much less skiboarders over there). I also get asked about them every time - and most people actually do know what these are and they say they have been thinking to get some, so they ask how they feel.

            So basically - people who don't ski have never heard of them, so beginners are not aware of this option. Then those who ski often have noticed them on the slopes and have an interest, but the lack of easy availability and information is why they haven't tried them.

            Thus I would agree with previous posters that the only way to become popular is to get some presence with rentals-ski shops-instructors.

            I also definitely agree with the Twin Tip comparisons. I am planning to get some for my son, so I was browsing some skiing forums and pretty much why twin tip fans praise them are the same things that people praise skiboarding here. I could just replace "twin tip" with "skiboard" and it would remain valid! And just in a few years twin tips moved to much shorter lengths, from directional to fully simmetrical, from backset to center mounted. If calling skiboards short-skis is quite incorrect, calling them "short twin tips" is much more closer to reality.

            I would guess one option to gain popularity is therefore to fully blend twin tips with skiboards. I.e. calling the longboards "twin tip ski boards" (with ski and boards separate words intentionally). And why not companies like Rvl8 and Spruce making some twin tip skis? Using the knowledge they have from skiboards they should be able to make some kick-ass stuff that would be easier to push to the mass markets than skiboards, but in the long run it will allow them to promote skiboarding along the tt.

            I also find the whole bindings situation complex and confusing for a newcomer and solving this is a must for gaining more popularity. I do think there should be direct-mount options for the longboards >110, those boards would be more attractive to new comers, who would be happy with a stiffer board, plus to get into rentals you need a rental binding. Or come up with another plate that uses the 4x4 but without the raise, so stg like the demo bindings but mounted on a 4x4. Giving a simpler option does not mean the riser plate should be killed - it will stay for more advanced skiboarders who want max performance.

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            • #21
              Skiboard Co-ops?

              So, I've been mulling over the whole access-to-skiboards question, and started wondering about the practicality of setting up skiboard co-ops in ski towns. The idea here would be to create a private club that would co-own a quiver of skiboards, to be used by the membership, with a yearly fee less than the cost of a pair of boards.

              Mostly, I see this as a way to get around the liability issues of rentals (since everyone involved is an owner) and allow the optional use of non-releasable bindings. The target market would be skiers who want to take out skiboards a few times during the season without fully committing to a purchase, and would work well for skiboarders to access a bigger quiver without actually buying a full set of new boards. That would be a major incentive to found such a club... the local resident skiboarder gets their hands on a wider range of rides, and has the ability to promote the sport directly without lending out their own personal gear. I'm all for lending my stuff, but do worry a little bit about liability issues if I lend to someone that's not a close friend.

              Thoughts?
              Make Skiboarding Sexy Again

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Steeps View Post
                So, I've been mulling over the whole access-to-skiboards question, and started wondering about the practicality of setting up skiboard co-ops in ski towns. The idea here would be to create a private club that would co-own a quiver of skiboards, to be used by the membership, with a yearly fee less than the cost of a pair of boards.

                Mostly, I see this as a way to get around the liability issues of rentals (since everyone involved is an owner) and allow the optional use of non-releasable bindings. The target market would be skiers who want to take out skiboards a few times during the season without fully committing to a purchase, and would work well for skiboarders to access a bigger quiver without actually buying a full set of new boards. That would be a major incentive to found such a club... the local resident skiboarder gets their hands on a wider range of rides, and has the ability to promote the sport directly without lending out their own personal gear. I'm all for lending my stuff, but do worry a little bit about liability issues if I lend to someone that's not a close friend.

                Thoughts?
                Maybe some regional clubs, I have a decent quiver that I donít mind sharing so others can try and find what they like


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                • #23
                  The only real way to know if our sport is growing, declining or holding it's own, would to know the actual sales of new boards over the last few seasons. Although that doesn't tell us how many folks are actually on the slopes, it is probably the best indicator of the health of the sport. I don't believe we will ever get this information though. Perhaps we should just be happy that RVL8, Spruce and Summit are selling enough boards to still be in business.
                  Just these, nothing else !

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