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boots: what do you prefer.

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  • wjeong
    replied
    Originally posted by Bill View Post
    There's a trick with Full Tilt boots using the "shim" system for forward lean adjustment to make them even more upright. Besides removing the shim, you can disassemble the boot and trim even more material from the bottom of the upper cuff where it contacts the lower shell. I've modified a few pair this way, it works great if you dislike excessive lean.
    Great tip Bill. I don't mind forward lean when I'm skiing. In fact, it makes it easier to put weight on my heels in powder. I just have to straighten up a bit. What I hate about forward lean is how hard it makes walking and just standing still.

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  • Bill
    replied
    Originally posted by Gromit View Post
    Some ski boots with adjustable forward lean such as the ones from Full Tilt have a spacing piece at the bottom, rear of the cuff which is designed to prevent the skier from taking an upright stance. It is possible to remove this spacer by taking out the canting screws. Full Tilt's boots come with plates for canting adjustment in the box. One swaps these around to adjust the canting/cuff alignment.
    There's a trick with Full Tilt boots using the "shim" system for forward lean adjustment to make them even more upright. Besides removing the shim, you can disassemble the boot and trim even more material from the bottom of the upper cuff where it contacts the lower shell. I've modified a few pair this way, it works great if you dislike excessive lean.

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  • Gromit
    replied
    Originally posted by FSTENUF View Post
    What's the best way to find an upright boot when shopping online? Are there certain specs or keywords that equate to upright or should I just rely on the photos? I've noticed some images can be deceiving based on the angle they show.
    Some ski boots with adjustable forward lean such as the ones from Full Tilt have a spacing piece at the bottom, rear of the cuff which is designed to prevent the skier from taking an upright stance. It is possible to remove this spacer by taking out the canting screws. Full Tilt's boots come with plates for canting adjustment in the box. One swaps these around to adjust the canting/cuff alignment.
    Last edited by Gromit; 02-20-2018, 02:33 AM. Reason: Added more info

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  • FSTENUF
    replied
    Thank you for the information, Bad Wolf. I need to pick up a set of boots for my wife and may need to get a less aggressive set of boots for myself as well.

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  • Bad Wolf
    replied
    Originally posted by FSTENUF View Post
    What's the best way to find an upright boot when shopping online? Are there certain specs or keywords that equate to upright or should I just rely on the photos? I've noticed some images can be deceiving based on the angle they show.
    Generally speaking, the boots that fall in the “Intermediate” range tend to be geared towards a compromise between comfort and performance. That means they will tend to have less forward lean, more width in the toe box, warmer liners, generous cuffs and a more forgiving flex. Some sites may randomly list the forward lean in the specs.

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  • FSTENUF
    replied
    What's the best way to find an upright boot when shopping online? Are there certain specs or keywords that equate to upright or should I just rely on the photos? I've noticed some images can be deceiving based on the angle they show.

    Leave a comment:


  • jessica
    replied
    Thanks that was all helpful!

    Really appreciate it!

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  • Bad Wolf
    replied
    If you do try boots on in a ski shop, which is a great way to check for fit and comfort, do be very wary of the sales staff. In general, they have no clue about skiboarding or the specific requirements we need in boots for a centered stance. Regardless of what you tell them, they are trained to try to get you into the narrowest, stiffest, most expensive, forward leaning boot they can. It’s not their fault, it’s what they have been told what people need to ski well. And regardless of what they tell you about boots “packing out”, if they are not comfortable in the shop, you have little chance of having fun on the slopes. This is not to say that a genuinely well trained boot fitter can’t do wonders for you, but they are few and far between.

    I have always used Level 9 for my boot purchases, as they have a “no questions asked” $7 return policy. That way you can try the boots on a home for a day and get a great idea of their comfort on your own time. Level 9 also have a great range of the style of boots that suit skiboarders, and at a great price. Both my wife and I have purchased boots from them, including the Atonic Live Fit series, which are very popular on the forum.

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  • Steeps
    replied
    I can't recommend any specific models, but for hard boots, the #1 consideration is comfort, in my opinion. If they don't feel good in the shop, they certainly won't feel good on the snow. Quite a few boot models will have a range of options for stiffness, so once you find something that fits there should be a little room to maneuver on performance. Some brands seem to fit different types of feet better than others. I've got narrow feet that are wide at the toes, and very skinny shanks, so there were only a few options that worked.

    If you've got a few shops in your area, go in and talk to the staff about what your general requirements are, and then just try everything in that range to see what fits. If it hurts right away, go on to the next one. If it feels good, crank it down and walk around the shop for 10 or 20 minutes to see if any problem areas develop. These days, many boots can be heat-molded to fit better, but if it's a good fit to start with you're less likely to have problems later.

    I bought new boots a season-and-a-half ago and it took a lot of trying to find something that would fit... I finally settled in on Salomon Xmax boots, but had to special order in a pair of 120s because none of the local shops had the stiffness I was looking for. They felt great in the shop, but it still took me 15+ days out to get them feeling good. I rode 5 or 6 short days on them before getting them molded, to break them in (not sure if it helped, or if I was just being a masochist, but the end result was pretty good).

    Mind you, I probably ride stiffer boots than most skiboarders, and tend to crank them down harder than I probably should (I've had to move my buckles in this year to tighten them up as they pack down). If you get a comfy pair of boots it might not be such a process.

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  • Bad Wolf
    replied
    Originally posted by jessica View Post
    I can guess the chance of finding others looking for women's boots here are quite low. But I would love any recommendations - the boots on this forum are all sold out (years ago). I have old stiff ski boots that I bought from a consignment shop currently. I'm getting quite good at skiboarding and I'd like to upgrade. My current boots are leaning too far forward and I'd like to try some straighter boots.

    - Wide feet
    - more straight
    - at least intermediate
    - I don't do rails, parks, trees much
    - I'd like to spend $300 or less on boots - but open to spending more if this is a really bad idea.
    - large calves
    - I ski every condition Ice / powder

    How do you think these would be?
    https://skiboards.com/product/alpina...ard-ski-boots/
    I don't see reviews anywhere

    suggestions?
    Mrs Wolf has a wide foot and highly recommends the Rossignol Evo 70. It is retailing for about $179 on various sites and has a nice combination of comfort and control.

    https://www.skis.com/Rossignol-Evo-7...hoCaR0QAvD_BwE

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  • jessica
    replied
    Updated boot suggestions?

    I can guess the chance of finding others looking for women's boots here are quite low. But I would love any recommendations - the boots on this forum are all sold out (years ago). I have old stiff ski boots that I bought from a consignment shop currently. I'm getting quite good at skiboarding and I'd like to upgrade. My current boots are leaning too far forward and I'd like to try some straighter boots.

    - Wide feet
    - more straight
    - at least intermediate
    - I don't do rails, parks, trees much
    - I'd like to spend $300 or less on boots - but open to spending more if this is a really bad idea.
    - large calves
    - I ski every condition Ice / powder

    How do you think these would be?
    https://skiboards.com/product/alpina...ard-ski-boots/
    I don't see reviews anywhere

    suggestions?

    Leave a comment:


  • Lsstefan
    replied
    Greetings.
    Sorry for bringing back old thread, but it's boots related and I'd rather not spam the forum with new threads.
    I found some nice snowboars boots and bindings for my skiboards. Boots are 8/10 flex and bindings 7/10(10 stiffest). I assume from what I've read that they should suffice.
    Now my question is this: i've read people being very happy with snow boots and that they carve ok with them, but what about tricks? I like to jump and spin and what now. How will soft boots fare to that?
    Should I stick to hard boots?

    Thank.you for the help.

    Leave a comment:


  • solaceiam
    replied
    Originally posted by zman View Post
    I purchased Dalbello CRX Freeride CarveX boots on eBay over 10 years ago, primarily for the Carve feature allowing extra flex compared to the upright ski mode potentially reducing shinbang/broken legs. The forward flex dial above the Carve/Walk/Ski switch provides even more adjustment; I haven't seen this type of option on a boot since, it's usually just Walk/Ski. They're listed as an intermediate/advanced level boot but with the added features it weighs in at just over 5lbs or 2440g, a little heavier than a few boots I tried on yesterday as I originally thought they were too small. With the liner removed I have about a 1 1/2 finger width behind my heel and the shell making for a snug fit meaning I need to wear a thin sock to avoid pressure on the top of my foot but they're comfortable and warm otherwise. So far I've only had them set to Carve mode and they've been great. I'm sure I'll increase the stiffness as my skill level goes up and with more time in the park. I'm not sure how this compares to what everyone else is wearing based on weight and flexibility.

    SWEET BOoTS!!

    Leave a comment:


  • solaceiam
    replied
    Salomon Ghost FS 80

    Hi Team,

    I'm new here.

    Has anyone tried the Salomon FS 80 Ski boots on a skiboard yet?

    it's on sale on where I am right now and I was wondering if it's a good boot for skiboarding.

    Leave a comment:


  • Nic
    replied
    Atomic B-Tech 50

    Have used rental as well as basic Salomon and Head boots and had real pain in the past, sometimes stopping mid run to flex the feet and ease the pain.

    Finally got fed up enough to go to a professional shop.

    Found the perfect fit for wide feet, The Atomic B-Tech 50's. Very wide last, nice comfy flex, not much adjustment but as they fit I'm happy. I did put the green Superfeet in to support a high instep and I found some calf pain in the shop where the boot rubbed. This was easily solved by a very cheap 'heel' lift solution. Now I can spend all day on the hill without thinking of my feet.

    I would definitely recommend the Atomics for riders with wide feet - stiffer flexes are available I think

    Leave a comment:

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