Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Good but Comfortable Boots!

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Abearonskis
    replied
    Originally posted by -MadsL-
    A possible solution for your existing boots might be a heat moldable liner.

    Do a dig on the web to see if there is a suitable liner for your Salomons and then get them heat molded to your feet at a specialist boot fitter.

    This might work, but if your hard shells are the wrong size to start with, it will only imporve things slightly.

    Good luck.
    The place where I bought my boots originally sized my feet wrong. It turns out they gave me a boot size one size smaller than I need it.

    Leave a comment:


  • -MadsL-
    replied
    A possible solution for your existing boots might be a heat moldable liner.

    Do a dig on the web to see if there is a suitable liner for your Salomons and then get them heat molded to your feet at a specialist boot fitter.

    This might work, but if your hard shells are the wrong size to start with, it will only imporve things slightly.

    Good luck.

    Leave a comment:


  • TheTickz
    replied
    I found that nordica boots are really comfortable. I found a very lightly used pair that fit me for only $35 online! I love them, have spent 2 full days wearing them on the slopes and have had no problems.

    Leave a comment:


  • wjeong
    replied
    If you are trying a pair of boots, wear them for at least a half hour in the store. Take your time and make sure they are comfortable. This is the minimum time I would wear them before buying.

    Leave a comment:


  • eldiablodenieve
    replied
    Originally posted by graeme
    anyone giving advice about what boots to buy without actually seeing the persons feet is 100% wrong. if you want boots go see a profesional bootfitter, be sized correctly, have your foot looked at for any problems, andf have the boots fitted to your feet. its not just a case of saying, oh you yhave narrow feet, i reccomend this boot. bootfitting is a hell of a lot more precise than that.
    but if you fancy boarding with a little discomfort, without ever getting the best performance from your boots, by all means listen to the experts here.
    Anyone who buys a boot without getting fitted or trying a boot on runs a serious risk of getting an ill fitting boot. However, that has nothing to do with getting advice about what boots are good for narrow feet versus wide feet or which boots have a more upright stance or better flex. I don't have to be an expert to tell some one with an E-EE width foot that they want to avoid a 98mm last or that the SPK, Kaos, and sprayer have softer flex at the cuff and are padded on the shin to prevent shin bang in the park. I got measured and fitted by a professional boot fitter and still paid another $250 to get the boots adjusted to just the way I wanted them. To say people should disregard any recommendations on this forum is IGNORANT.

    Leave a comment:


  • graeme
    replied
    Originally posted by eldiablodenieve
    You can get alot of information about boots on a forum. That is why professional boot reviewers (some of which are fitters) talk about more than just technical specs of the boots i.e. what boots are better for styles of riding, foot width, etc. You can go to a pro fitter to get proper size but more than half of them don't know how a boot will perform for skiboarding or freeskiing. If there is any advice that should't be listened to on the forum it is yours.
    anyone giving advice about what boots to buy without actually seeing the persons feet is 100% wrong. if you want boots go see a profesional bootfitter, be sized correctly, have your foot looked at for any problems, andf have the boots fitted to your feet. its not just a case of saying, oh you yhave narrow feet, i reccomend this boot. bootfitting is a hell of a lot more precise than that.
    but if you fancy boarding with a little discomfort, without ever getting the best performance from your boots, by all means listen to the experts here.

    Leave a comment:


  • eldiablodenieve
    replied
    Originally posted by graeme
    dont listen to anty advice on forums, go see a proper boot fitter and have a pair fitted properly.
    You can get alot of information about boots on a forum. That is why professional boot reviewers (some of which are fitters) talk about more than just technical specs of the boots i.e. what boots are better for styles of riding, foot width, etc. You can go to a pro fitter to get proper size but more than half of them don't know how a boot will perform for skiboarding or freeskiing. If there is any advice that should't be listened to on the forum it is yours.

    Leave a comment:


  • Abearonskis
    replied
    Originally posted by Manlenium
    I wear a size 13 boot, and I have a high instep. Salomans fit wide and tall. I am almost a "D" width.

    You know not to make you look stupid or anything but "D" width is the common width for footwear. IF you had a wide foot you would be in the "W" or "E" range.

    Leave a comment:


  • Branden
    replied
    alright heres a quick low down, i had to take classes from company reps when i worked at the ski shop.

    1) comfort comes first NOT PRICE

    2) the ski boot should be EXACTLY what ur foot measures. if ur foot is a 9 (27) then buy a 27 MAYBE a 27.5, do not get boots bigger for "comfort" that is horribley bad.

    since boots have hard shells they are molded for a basic foot design, so when u buy a boot to big ur foot wont sit in it right.

    your toes ARE supposed to be touching the ends, with very little wiggle room. when boots are too big ur feet slide and u get black n blue nails and bruised toes.

    your heal SHOULD NOT lift up when walking around in them, sign that boots are too big.



    when u put ur boot on for the first time it should feel a bit over snug. lightly buckle the boot and squat down which will pull ur heel back into the pocket and toes away from the edge, (notice how boots are angled to give proper ski position)

    DO NOT wear cotton sox. that is one of the worst things you can do. cotton absorbs moisture which freezes ur feet. if ur boot is too big and u wear cotton it will roll and craete blisters.

    SOX arnt ment to keep ur feet super warm, they are ment to whick away moisture keeping them DRY. the boots padding will keep them warm.

    so wear neoprene or smart wool sox.


    comfort first then money,

    a pair of 750$ boots that hurt will ruin ur day.

    a pair of 200$ boots that make ur feet happy will make ur day happy.




    in general:

    salomon runs wider and flatter than most boots

    dalbello are for average to slightly wider feet

    technica are for think feet, and/or with a high instep


    hope this helped u some.

    -B

    Leave a comment:


  • Greco
    replied
    225's have a moldable liner. i've been using the deeluxe boots for years and they are the most comfortable boots i've ever worn and i used to have foot pain all the time with all different boots.

    g

    Leave a comment:


  • graeme
    replied
    dont listen to anty advice on forums, go see a proper boot fitter and have a pair fitted properly.

    Leave a comment:


  • CrazyBoy-1
    replied
    Yeah, if you don't have releaseable bindings, alpine snowboard boots are the way to go IMO. I really like my 225's.

    Leave a comment:


  • SkaFreak
    replied
    I wear anything from 12-13 and have fairly wide feet. the most comfortable boots I found were hardshell snowboard boots, but had to switch over to some Dalbello Rampages because I've started using release bindings now that I have a pair of Sherpas.

    Leave a comment:


  • shaggy433
    replied
    I also wear a 13 street and I rented a pair of Nordica boots that fit great...now they are mine...lol

    Leave a comment:


  • dcox20
    replied
    I wear 13 or 14 street shoes depending on the brand. I have Salomon boots which worked ok and SoftLight 3's which are my current weapons of choice

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X