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  • Skating on Skiboards

    Hey all,

    I have a potentially unusual question:

    Have any of you ever tried skating with skiboards over longer distances? Like on rollerblades?
    The snow season is pretty long here, and so is the cross country skiing season, many people cross country ski to work here.
    Since I kind of dislike cross country skis, and people compare skiboards to rollerblades often, I thought, why not "cross country skiboard" aka skate to work on skiboards. And like that I would still be able to use the boards on the mountain as well.
    Have any of you ever tried something like that? From my home it's around 4.5 km to work (ca. 2.8 miles). It's not too long, but it does get hilly on the way. On the other hand, 90% of the way is prepared very well for cross country skiing anyways.

    If it is something to consider at all, would kind of boards would you use?
    Short ones like tanshos (or even bantams) for mobility like rollerblades or long ones, so they would run better and stable, closer to the length of cross country skis?
    Narrow ones for easily pushing of the edge or maybe even wider ones (like blunts), so I can float through some deeper shortcuts at two points or use them as snowshoes to cross some ungroomed parts?
    Cambered for the edge hold or maybe rockered for the powder parts, and maybe even for twisting them outwards easier for the push?
    Softer ones for maneuverability or maybe even stiffer ones (like playmakers)?

    And then, which bindings?
    Hard boot bindings for stability while skating or rather soft boot binding for comfort and mobility?

    I know, it's a potentially very silly idea, but I really hate cross country skis, and love going downhill on skiboards, so I thought why not see, if I can make use of some skiboards for both occasions.
    I'd love to hear what you think.

  • #2
    Actually I think it's quite an interesting idea, not at all silly.

    I would go for the thinnest and shortest skiboards that you can find, to replicate best the inline/ice skating experience. This means the Bantams. Their description says the same, and to me it makes sense: you want them short - so they don't overlap behind you when you skate, making a V shape - cross country skis I think they are rather meant to be "pushed" forth rather than skated aside. Then you want them narrow - the wider they are, the less easy they would be to put on edge.

    But this assumes that you'll be going on the cross-country path, mainly skating or gliding on a relatively groomed surface.

    For those shortcuts through powder areas - Bantams are exactly the opposite, being narrow and short they would not float you much (or at all). But wide, powder boards will not work on more/most parts of your trail, so I guess you need to chose the path that works best for the skiboards you'll pick.

    Myself: RVL8 2011 KTP, Spruce 125 LE, RVL8 "Drooling Clouds" RCs, Spruce 2016 Osprey
    Daughter: Twoowt Pirania 95cm; RVL8 2015 Blunt XL; RVL8 2021 SII; Spruce Crossbows
    Past: RVL8 2010 Revolt Trees, RVL8 2014 Condor, RVL8 2009 ALPdors, Spruce 120 Yellow/Red

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    • #3
      Thanks for your thoughts.
      Concerning the cross country style: there are two types of cross country skis, those that are meant to be pushed forward, they have a sticky bottom that helps you push off, and you use them in the ski-tracks, but then there are also those type that are meant to be skated, and with those people actually do the v shape style despite their length, as you know it from biathlon, etc. The latter is why I thought, maybe longer skiboards are an option, too.

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      • #4
        Maybe carry some collapsible ski poles for long, flat areas where skating your skiboards gets too tiring? Short uphills too?
        Something like the Burton x Black Diamond Compactor Poles say?
        Also sold by Black Diamond themselves (may be cheaper than the ones that they supply to Burton. )
        Last edited by Gromit; 10-30-2023, 08:51 AM. Reason: Added extra info
        Spruce Crossbow 115 "Ski Track" skiboards - My Go To skiboards
        Tyrolia Attack2 13 GW release bindings on Spruce Risers
        Nordica HF110 ski boots

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Gromit View Post
          Maybe carry some collapsible ski poles for long, flat areas where skating your skiboards gets too tiring? Short uphills too?
          Something like the Burton x Black Diamond Compactor Poles say?
          Yeah, definitely considering poles. I don't think it's much fun without.
          Thanks for the links.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by piet-0 View Post
            Thanks for your thoughts.
            Concerning the cross country style: there are two types of cross country skis, those that are meant to be pushed forward, they have a sticky bottom that helps you push off, and you use them in the ski-tracks, but then there are also those type that are meant to be skated, and with those people actually do the v shape style despite their length, as you know it from biathlon, etc. The latter is why I thought, maybe longer skiboards are an option, too.
            Oh, okay, I see, from my pov I had a different usage in mind.

            In my mind I would go pole-less, so I would always be skating (V-shape) on both flats and up on inclines, that's why I would want them short and thin. Downside is off-track shorcuts would be hard to take.

            As far as I can tell, cross-country guys go poles + push straightforward on flats and V-shape + poles on inclines. It would indeed be easier to mimic this on longer skiboards, something like the Crossbows, which are not that wide and would also be fit for any shortcuts that you might want, plus be useable in normal skiing conditions.

            But the cross-country guys use different bidings style, to go their way you probably need backcountry bindings. On Bantams non-release should be good, and they would not add much weight.

            I don't have any experience with soft boots, so don't know if they would be a better fit for skating in them.
            Myself: RVL8 2011 KTP, Spruce 125 LE, RVL8 "Drooling Clouds" RCs, Spruce 2016 Osprey
            Daughter: Twoowt Pirania 95cm; RVL8 2015 Blunt XL; RVL8 2021 SII; Spruce Crossbows
            Past: RVL8 2010 Revolt Trees, RVL8 2014 Condor, RVL8 2009 ALPdors, Spruce 120 Yellow/Red

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            • #7
              I roller and inline skate. I have wondered if these would be a good choice for skating on snow:

              https://www.snowfeetstore.com/products/snowfeet1

              https://www.snowfeetstore.com/produc...rd-boots-model

              https://www.snowfeetstore.com/produc...ki-boots-model
              Boards/Bindings:
              2013 Spruce Sherpas w/Tyrolia Peak 11s
              2023 Spruce Stingers w/Tyrolia Peak 11s
              2015 RVL8 Blunt XLs w/Tyrolia Attack 13s
              2020 RVL8 Sticky Icky Ickys w/Tyrolia SX 10s


              Boots:
              Salomon X-Pro 80

              Past boards: Salomon Snowblades, Line MNPs 89 & 98 cm, Five-Os, Bullets, Jedis, Spruce 120s, LE 125s, Ospreys, Crossbows
              Summit 110s, Nomads, Jades, RVL8 ALPs, BWPs, KTPs, Tanshos, Rockets, DLPs, Blunts, Condors, RCs, Revolts, Spliffs

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              • #8
                Originally posted by newbie2011 View Post

                Oh, okay, I see, from my pov I had a different usage in mind.

                In my mind I would go pole-less, so I would always be skating (V-shape) on both flats and up on inclines, that's why I would want them short and thin. Downside is off-track shorcuts would be hard to take.
                It is interesting to me, that you seem to make a difference between skating with or without poles. It is the same to me, legwise, just with or without support by the arms. When I made the comparison to cross country skis, I never meant the classic push forward style used in the tracks, I meant the skating version. Even on cross country skis I would always be skating, including flats. But maybe even with the skating style there actually is a difference with the bindings, as you said. I hadn't considered that. Thanks for your insights.

                Yeah, I was thinking of those, too.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by piet-0 View Post

                  It is interesting to me, that you seem to make a difference between skating with or without poles. It is the same to me, legwise, just with or without support by the arms. When I made the comparison to cross country skis, I never meant the classic push forward style used in the tracks, I meant the skating version. Even on cross country skis I would always be skating, including flats. But maybe even with the skating style there actually is a difference with the bindings, as you said. I hadn't considered that. Thanks for your insights.
                  Haha, yeah, it's funny and interesting how a rather simple problem lends itself to many interpretations and options

                  The backcountry bindings would work best in a cross-country, push forward style, which I now understand is not what you have in mind,

                  So what would skate best, V-style, between Snowfeet, short skiboards and long-ish skiboards ... I would go for short skiboards/skiblades

                  Snowfeets look interesting, but the balance seems delicate, not sure how much lateral hold they have when you try to get speed, it's not that clear from their videos. For uphill they suggest to just take them off ( https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9Kk3yIcKe1A ) This works for skiboards as well

                  What I would be concered of, no matter the solution, is to have a solid, strong connection between your feet/boots and the sliding device. Years ago I've tried the Skorpion quad roller skates (searching for a short commute fast-ish option on dry roads), that you could attach to any shoes or boots (like those first two options of snowfeet) and I did not like them at all, they always had a bit of lateral give when pushing for speed, so it was a worse experience than using normal inline/quad skates, especially going uphill.

                  Actually I see the Snowfeet guys have also some 65cm skiblades that look good https://www.snowfeetstore.com/produc...i-skis-26-inch

                  To me it would be between these and the Bantams ( they are even close in size 11-9.5-11 vs 12-10-12 )
                  Myself: RVL8 2011 KTP, Spruce 125 LE, RVL8 "Drooling Clouds" RCs, Spruce 2016 Osprey
                  Daughter: Twoowt Pirania 95cm; RVL8 2015 Blunt XL; RVL8 2021 SII; Spruce Crossbows
                  Past: RVL8 2010 Revolt Trees, RVL8 2014 Condor, RVL8 2009 ALPdors, Spruce 120 Yellow/Red

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by newbie2011 View Post

                    Years ago I've tried the Skorpion quad roller skates (searching for a short commute fast-ish option on dry roads), that you could attach to any shoes or boots (like those first two options of snowfeet) and I did not like them at all, they always had a bit of lateral give when pushing for speed, so it was a worse experience than using normal inline/quad skates, especially going uphill
                    I tried the Skorpion skates a few years back, too. They were absolutely horrible. I returned them.
                    Boards/Bindings:
                    2013 Spruce Sherpas w/Tyrolia Peak 11s
                    2023 Spruce Stingers w/Tyrolia Peak 11s
                    2015 RVL8 Blunt XLs w/Tyrolia Attack 13s
                    2020 RVL8 Sticky Icky Ickys w/Tyrolia SX 10s


                    Boots:
                    Salomon X-Pro 80

                    Past boards: Salomon Snowblades, Line MNPs 89 & 98 cm, Five-Os, Bullets, Jedis, Spruce 120s, LE 125s, Ospreys, Crossbows
                    Summit 110s, Nomads, Jades, RVL8 ALPs, BWPs, KTPs, Tanshos, Rockets, DLPs, Blunts, Condors, RCs, Revolts, Spliffs

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Last season I bought the Head Speed Disc Soft Boot Binding System from RVL8 and the wide Rockered Condors to go with my wide cambered KTPs and narrow, cambered Line Jedi 88 cm SkiBoards.

                      My ability to change boards in minutes allowed me to easily compare snow conditions, maneuverability and flotation in powder.

                      I recommend the Line Jedi, or any other sub 100 cm skiboard like the Line MNPs. I find the "skate ability" of the smallest and most agile boards combined with the light easy soft boot bindings

                      to be the best choice for skating to work (with poles at least on your pack).

                      I further recommend that you dispense with wax and apply the DPS Phantom base compound to the boards. (see Postings in the Forum).

                      No release for me, and no heavy ski boots after 73 yrs of age. I die with my RVL8 SkiBoards ON!!!



                      was on Big Foots, Cannons, Klimax Redline, 98 Line MNPs, Line ff cam and bomber bindings - new boards: RVL8 2015 SII, 2011 KTP --24 yrs non released - -skiboarding til 2050!!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by newbie2011 View Post

                        Actually I see the Snowfeet guys have also some 65cm skiblades that look good https://www.snowfeetstore.com/produc...i-skis-26-inch

                        To me it would be between these and the Bantams ( they are even close in size 11-9.5-11 vs 12-10-12 )
                        Thanks. The Bantams were the first ones I had in mind, too.

                        Maybe the Snowfeet Skiskates would be an option, too. At least they're called skates.


                        I recommend the Line Jedi, or any other sub 100 cm skiboard like the Line MNPs. I find the "skate ability" of the smallest and most agile boards combined with the light easy soft boot bindings
                        But would soft boot bindings still work well on not so wide boards?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I've thought about this sort of thing, mostly as a joke to piss off the skate-skiers. I think long poles like they use would help, especially uphill. Not sure how short of a board you'd want to go with, but light and makes sense (my DLPs skate well, but would be a bit heavy for prolonged flat travel I think). It takes more effort to get wide boards up on edge when skating hard. Cambered boards skate better than fully rockered ones in my experience.... you get some spring out of the compressed camber which scoots you forward. My Playmakers don't skate nearly as energetically.

                          Unless you have a lot of long, gentle undisturbed slopes, I wouldn't put a priority on float. If it's your regular route you'll pack a trail in fairly quickly and won't need to worry about it. Most skiboards are OK for snowshoeing in, you'll pack trails there too.

                          You'd need some sort of an adaptor plate, but it might be worth trying a skate-ski boot and binding setup if this is just a travel setup and not for downhill (especially if you have or can get some used boots). It'd be light and give the right sort of connection to the board.

                          I agree with Baldybob that some sub-100 cm first generation skiboards like Lines might work great. I used to be able to do crossovers when skating in circles on my Canon M7s, and I'm not much of an ice or wheel skater.
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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Steeps View Post

                            I've thought about this sort of thing, mostly as a joke to piss off the skate-skiers.
                            You mean the cross country skaters by that, right? Yeah, I had that in mind, too. Up here, people are cross country skiing like zealots, and they poke everyone out of the ordinary off the tracks with their poles.

                            I think long poles like they use would help, especially uphill.
                            Yeah, for sure. Although, I might prefer collapsible ones, as suggested by Gromit.

                            Cambered boards skate better than fully rockered ones in my experience.
                            I was only considering rockered, because of the twistability in the spot.

                            You'd need some sort of an adaptor plate, but it might be worth trying a skate-ski boot and binding setup if this is just a travel setup and not for downhill (especially if you have or can get some used boots).
                            Again, you mean a cross country set up, right? Yeah, it would be interesting on skiboards. However, there are quite some hills on the way. People take them easily on their cross country skis, but on skiboards with cross country bindings, I don't know.

                            Thanks for your thoughts.



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                            • #15
                              The two forms of cross country / Nordic skiing here are usually referred to as classic (in tracks, slide forward step by step) and skate-skiing (on cross country skis, at faster speeds than classic). So yes, when I say skate ski I mean cross country, but that particular form. You've made the distinction above and I see that's what you're aiming for.

                              Interesting point on the downhills. I was picturing mostly flat or small downhills for some reason. You'd lose a lot of control with cross country bindings.

                              I guess it depends if you think heel lift would help in skating or not. Jack's backcountry setup uses a pin binding for the toe and a quick to fasten lever on the back of the boot, which would make them adaptable between flat/uphill (free heel) and downhill (locked in). I've been playing around with a modified version of this (without the heel lever) but haven't used them enough to know how they skate with just the toes locked in.

                              I can skate fairly well in skiboards, and need to use it frequently on my mountain to get to some walk-in areas, but with standard bindings and no poles it's nowhere near as fast as cross country skiing. I ride fairly long and wide boards, though.
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