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  1. #1 Foot drop issue - Considering trying skiboarding 
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    Hi All - Just joined the forum to try to get some info on skiboarding. I am a 50 year old male who has skied on and off in the past but never really got beyond novice level. About years ago I sustained a severe lower back disc herniation which left me with a right foot drop - the inability to raise the foot upward toward the shin (dorsiflex). As a result, I seem to have real problems controlling my turns when I ski. Probably bad technique is a large part of it - probably if I had gotten good at carving on skis I might be OK. Also, the right ski feels pretty heavy with the foot issue, and it cause fatigue and exacerbates things. It gotten to the point where I sit in the lodge while my family is on the slopes, as I have pretty much lost all confidence.

    Thus I am thinking about trying skiboarding. The shorter and presumably lighter and hopefully easier to control skiboards might make it easier to control things. What do the folks here think about this? I am about 6' and weigh about 225lb, so I was thinking about something like 120 boards.

    Any and all opinions or advice would be most welcome!
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  2. #2  
    Hardcore Skiboarder zman's Avatar
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    Skiboarding seems to be a gathering sliding sport from skiers and snowboarders alike, be it injury or otherwise. I only skied once in my life almost 20 years ago so I can't compare how it feels to throw around a longer pair of boards. The only times I've noticed I made any large amount of dorsiflex movement on skiboards has either been while skating uphill, during or recovering from a wipeout while attempting to get up or when really weighting the tails in rough terrain or powder. If you're spending your time on groomed runs I don't foresee there being an issue, even when carving as long as it's not ultra aggressive, as the majority of the work is just shifted weight making turns very quick and easy on skiboards. If you're aiming at maintaining perfect knee knocking ski form that may be where your problem is. It's great to watch it being executed though perhaps more jarring with your injury to maintain.

    120's, Rockered Condor, soft flex Revolts or perhaps Blunts would all be potential options. I'd recommend using poles, considering your situation, regardless of the boards you select. I'm sure someone with more riding experience on 120's, RC's or Blunts will chime in shortly on how either may or may not be advantageous for you. I can meander down the hill on my Revolts with ease, standing tall making only slight weight and lateral ankle adjustments, cruising anywhere I desire with a skate/sliding(slarving) motion. That's not how I normally ride but it's an effortless execution of how easy skiboards are to control.
    Boards: RVL*8 '08 Revolt Chicken's, Canon M7 Black, Line Fly 4 post
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    Gear: Dalbello CRX Freeride CarveX, Bern Baker Hard Hat, VZ Fishbowl's & Fubar's, Anon Comrade
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  3. #3  
    Hardcore Skiboarder Wookie's Avatar
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    Blindvision -- First welcome to the forum. I feel your back pain (quite literally). I have a bulged disc in my lower back and while I don't have any mobility issues it does cause pain during some activities. At 6'5" 200lbs I am of similar build to you and the Spruce 120s are my go to skiboards. They are long enough to support a larger rider in most conditions except extreme ice and deep powder but certainly anything the East Coast throws at me. They are short enough that they are very forgiving and do not require perfect technique. They may be perfect for you but here are two things to consider:

    • The 120s are a heavy skiboard with their width and binding/riser combination and may be tough for you to use a lifting motion to correct for technique issues but are easier than long ski
    • I started on a 101cm skiboard and did just fine so shorter boards can handle a bigger rider. The sacrifice is edge length and stopping power but not an issue if you intend to be a mellow cruiser

    Most of the riders who have tried the 120s love them and they work great bigger riders however given the two items above ask yourself if getting a skiboard as light as you can get is what you really need. It might not be the length of the skis just the weight. If so you might want to consider shorter than a 120.

    Before you take the plunge and grab a pair of 120s or other skiboards I would suggest that you try to find a local hill or shop that will rent you some short skis or "skiblades". These will not be the same construction as high end skiboards like the 120s but should give you an idea if skiboarding is what you need to get you back out on the mountain with your friends and family.
    Boards:
    2016 Spruce tuned Head Jr. Caddys - 131cm
    2013 Spruce "CTS" 120s
    2010 Spruce "Yellow/Red" 120s
    2018 Spruce "CTS" Crossbows - 115cm
    2016 RVL8 Spliffs - 109cm
    2008 RVL8 Revolt "City" - 105cm
    2017 RVL8 Sticky Icky Icky - 104cm
    2011 Defiance Blades - 101cm
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  4. #4  
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    Many thanks Zman for the kind words of wisdom. Yeah, my objective is just to get out with the family - green, eventually blue groomers. Nothing too radical.

    The foot issue on skis really just seemed to be an inability to get the ski around quickly at speed. I had moved to 153's and still was having issues. Overcompensating with my right hip just lead to pain, etc. Just not worth it. I was watching video of folks carving on skiboards and the movement just looks different and maybe easier than skiing.

    I am tempted to try shorter boards for a completely different experience. However I am a bit "top heavy" - lol - so looking for that right size board for both maneruverability and stability. I was looking at the Spruce 120s but will check out the other brands you suggest. Definitely will stick with poles - at least at the beginning.

    Thanks again.
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  5. #5  
    Hardcore Skiboarder shortydude's Avatar
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    Get to a good reputable boot fitter! When you have foot/ankle issues getting the right boot can make the difference between not being able to ski at all and a truly enjoyable day. If you don't have the right boots it probably won't matter what skis you're trying to control. There is a wide variation in the amount of forward lean in boot cuffs. It sounds like you may need an aggressively leaned forward boot. That would help with getting your tips up getting off a lift easier. A good boot fitter may also see things going on that you have been unaware of. Spend your money on fitted boots first, then you will make better choices when you try various skiboards. There are several forumites on the East Coast that you could meet up with or you could rent a pair here from Greco. I would hate for you to get the wrong impression about skiboards if the problem could have been solved by a good reputable boot fitter.

    I would start by asking for suggestions at this boot fitters forum.
    http://www.epicski.com/f/73/ask-the-boot-guys

    Good luck and keep us posted on your quest.
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  6. #6  
    Hardcore Skiboarder Wookie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by blindvision View Post
    .... The foot issue on skis really just seemed to be an inability to get the ski around quickly at speed. I had moved to 153's and still was having issues. Overcompensating with my right hip just lead to pain, etc. Just not worth it. I was watching video of folks carving on skiboards and the movement just looks different and maybe easier than skiing.....
    Does your drop foot issue allow you to ice or roller skate? Skiboarding, especially on shortboards, shares a lot of similarities with skating. If you can skate you will most likely be able to skiboard. Skiboarding, unlike skiing, does not punish you as much when your feet are not working together. If your feet are out of sync you just pick up the rogue foot and get it back in line. However, if your foot issues won't allow you to skate, skiboarding may not be the magic bullet you are looking for.
    Boards:
    2016 Spruce tuned Head Jr. Caddys - 131cm
    2013 Spruce "CTS" 120s
    2010 Spruce "Yellow/Red" 120s
    2018 Spruce "CTS" Crossbows - 115cm
    2016 RVL8 Spliffs - 109cm
    2008 RVL8 Revolt "City" - 105cm
    2017 RVL8 Sticky Icky Icky - 104cm
    2011 Defiance Blades - 101cm
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  7. #7  
    Hardcore Skiboarder valmorel's Avatar
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    Blindvision there is a huge difference between skiing and skiboarding. When skiboarding you don't have to unweight. You steer basically with the soles of your feet, kind of just rolling the feet from side to side. It is very low effort and very intuitive. You will discover a whole new world of fun with skiboards. Most of the products available on this site will serve you well. Enjoy!

    Sent from my Nexus 7 using Tapatalk
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  8. #8  
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    Thanks to all for the great advice. I will definitely look to rent some SBs in a couple of weeks when we head up to Smuggs for the weekend to give it a try. Unfortunately I suspect it may be hard to find some rental equipment. In the meantime, I'll continue to acquaint with the great info on this site.

    Will let you know how it goes - appreciate all the input!
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  9. #9 Rentals on this site 
    Skiboarder Ronin's Avatar
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    If you type in demo in the search you can rent skiboards from skiboardsonline, which I say might be desireable giving you an option to try before you buy!
    "Like a bitch in heat, I seem to attract a coterie of policemen and sanitation officials!"
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  10. #10  
    Skiboarder @zenboyscout's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ronin View Post
    If you type in demo in the search you can rent skiboards from skiboardsonline, which I say might be desireable giving you an option to try before you buy!
    For sure. Get you rental from the source; you'll get perfect gear maintained by the people who know it best.

    Ivebeen on ice skates since I was 4 and did freestyle inline skating from about 16; a passion I gave up in my late twenties due to expired warranties on my knees. Without factory support, the human body is expensive. Just ask Lee Majors

    I digress

    Skiboarding was an immediate fit for me, tho I started out on salomon buzz 90 snow blades. The have cheesy plastic non release bindings. I'm use to staying directly over my feet at all times, which is Good instinct for shorties. Whatever length you choose remember that you are in a sports car now; there are no backseats. I find the short boards (80cm-99cm) very easy to rotate and if they are on the more slender side they are very easy to edge with. Also, i learned how to fall while inline skating; its important survival techniques; admit youre crashing and tuck in. All in all, quite effortless considering my motive energy was gravity and not my thighs.

    In my opinion, consider renting more than one pair. Get the 120's for sure. I just bought a pair and have yet to test them. Warm And rainy here. Renting a pair of dlp's or something in the 100cm range wih fixed Bindings. Risk of injury you would measure yourself, but the weight advantage is massive. My pair of bwp/slapdashes with fixed bindings are about the same weight as one of my 120's with pro risers and tyrolia sl100 bindings.
    FT Konflict
    BWP "Carbon Zombie"
    Spruce 120 "Chairlifts"
    Spruce Risers w/SL100 bindings
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  11. #11  
    GGO Co-Founder | SBOLTeam III Rider bee's Avatar
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    I say get some 120s, they sound perfect for you. Use them with or without poles whichever you prefer. Make sure your boots fit decently well and enjoy.

    If your boots are to loose you will have to put in way more effort to stay in control.

    I assume you were referring to the japanese carving video? It is the best out there at the moment. It should take little effort to steer.
    www.skiboardbindings.com GGO Co-Founder

    Check out a review of our bindings http://www.skiboardsonline.com/forum...ad.php?t=13031 (Thanks Rob)

    My setup:
    DLP/Ktps (randomly switch)
    Condors, not rockered (powder/crap conditions board)
    GGO soft boot bindings
    Ride RFL Snowboard Boots
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