Thread: buying boots

Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1. #1 buying boots 
    Junior Skiboarder
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Location
    Jersey city, NJ
    Age
    28
    Posts
    11
    Rep Power
    0
    I've skied for about 10 years and skiboarded a few times (I prefer skiboarding, but not everywhere will rent them). I've finally decided that I've had enough of renting and want to buy my own equipment. I am a competent skier, although I would never call myself an expert I can still make it down single black diamond slopes in one piece and have even tried a few double black diamonds with some success.

    I spoke to someone in a ski shop today about boots and he told that I probably want a stiffer boot around the 100flex range. However, he only knew about skis, not skiboards, so I wanted to ask on here if there were any special considerations for skiboards. In particular, I've seen in some of the posts that you actually want a more flexible boot for skiboarding. Is this true?

    The reason I ask is that I've found these boots on a skiboarding website, which look great and they have amazing reviews, but they have a flex rating of 60, which I'm worried would be too soft for me. http://www.skiboards.com/skiboard-bo...-201516-p-1218

    Do you think these would be a good boot choice or am I better off going with something stiffer like http://www.evo.com/outlet/alpine-ski...-110-2014.aspx

    For reference, I'm 5'7" tall 150lb man

    Thanks in advance!
    Reply With Quote  
     

  2. #2  
    CoFounder | Skiboardmagazine.com Roussel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Whistler
    Age
    33
    Posts
    3,113
    Rep Power
    21
    Flex index is not a good measure of anything other than comparing models of the same brand because every company has its own ''flex index''.

    Skiboarders generally like a boot that is slightly softer than what the same level skier would use, and slightly more upright. In practical terms, this can often mean just down grading one model of ski boot than the one a skier would use. (will save you some cash too!)

    i highly recommend that your #1 priority be getting a good fit from a boot fitter, go try on many boots and listen to their advice. It is much more important than flex or anything else. Just tell them exactly what you said here, you're a competent skier, you can make it down double blacks, and you'd like something just slightly softer and more upright than what he would recommend because you are on skiboards. (tell them about skiboardsonline forum!)

    i can't stress enough, just go to a boot fitter. its free and can save you lots of pain and cold feet.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  3. #3  
    Junior Skiboarder
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Location
    Jersey city, NJ
    Age
    28
    Posts
    11
    Rep Power
    0
    Thanks very much, that's very helpful. Will any sports/outdoor store (e.g. REI) have a boot fitter or do I need somwhere more specific? On that note, does anyone know of a good boot fitter in NYC?
    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #4  
    Hardcore Skiboarder Wookie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    New Jersey
    Age
    45
    Posts
    2,484
    Rep Power
    12
    Quote Originally Posted by kfinn6561 View Post
    ...Will any sports/outdoor store (e.g. REI) have a boot fitter or do I need somwhere more specific?
    Not likely at an REI or other general outdoors store in NY/NJ. You need to find a store that focuses on skiing and ski equipment to ensure they have a boot fitter on staff.

    Quote Originally Posted by kfinn6561 View Post
    On that note, does anyone know of a good boot fitter in NYC?
    Arguably the best boot fitter in NYC is Surefoot. 1438 Third Avenue - (between 81st and 82nd). I purchased my boots there and love them. Surefoot specializes in custom skiboots and makes a great product but that specialization and custom work comes with a price. I would not expect to leave Surefoot under $600 for basic boots and $800-1000 for full customs. I tried other boots before going to Surefoot and only went there as a last resort to see if I could combat some old hockey injuries. I love their product and service but hate the cost. If money is no issue you can start there but it's not usually necessary to invest a ton to get great boots. SureFoot will do a foot assessment for free and evaluate what you need in a boot even if you don't buy so if you are in the City it may be worth the stop just for that but I warned you about the cost.

    Some more reasonable options that I know of in NJ include:

    Ski Barn (Lawrenceville) - http://www.skibarn.com - Nice little ski shop near Trenton. They have a few other outlets over Central and North Jersey. The closest one to you might be their Paramus store but I have never been there so give them a call to see if they do boot fitting. I know they do in Lawrenceville.

    D&Q (Cherry Hill) - http://www.dandq.com/ - This is my local shop and where my wife and kids got their boots. Great fitters here though a bit a drive from Jersey City (2hrs+). They are very good at working in a budget and any modifications on boots you buy there are free for most work. My wife got awesome boots under $150 and they did major tweaks to them to make them fit perfectly at no extra cost including a return trip to remove a small hot spot.

    You can use the "find a fitter" tool at this website to find some more options -- http://www.bootfitters.com/find-shop -- There are also some great resources to read on this site.

    On a side note: Try to joining us at some of the local meet-ups this season in the area. Looks like there will be at least two. One at Mt Creek in NJ and one at Elk Mountain is PA. Always fun to connect with other short board riders and check out different gear and set-up that others are using.
    Boards:
    2016 Spruce tuned Head Jr. Caddys - 131cm
    2013 Spruce "CTS" 120s
    2010 Spruce "Yellow/Red" 120s
    2018 Spruce "CTS" Crossbows - 115cm
    2016 RVL8 Spliffs - 109cm
    2008 RVL8 Revolt "City" - 105cm
    2017 RVL8 Sticky Icky Icky - 104cm
    2011 Defiance Blades - 101cm
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #5  
    Junior Skiboarder
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Location
    Jersey city, NJ
    Age
    28
    Posts
    11
    Rep Power
    0
    Thanks fr the advice! I'll definitely try to check out those stores, although I don't have a car, so Cherry hill is probably too far.

    Likewise, Id love to join you guys for some meet-ups once I've got my gear and there's some snow on the ground. Again, transport is an issue for me, but hopefully there will be someone else coming from my neck of the woods that I can get a ride from.

    One last question. I'm viewing some LaGriffe Titanal 99cm skiboards tomorrow that I found on craigslist. Is there anything in particular I should be looking for when deciding whether or not to get them? Besides the obvious large scratches and dings etc.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  6. #6  
    Hardcore Skiboarder Wookie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    New Jersey
    Age
    45
    Posts
    2,484
    Rep Power
    12
    Quote Originally Posted by kfinn6561 View Post
    ....One last question. I'm viewing some LaGriffe Titanal 99cm skiboards tomorrow that I found on craigslist. Is there anything in particular I should be looking for when deciding whether or not to get them? Besides the obvious large scratches and dings etc.
    There were a pair of these up for sale on the forum last year. They are certainly a cool looking board but I have never ridden them so I can't comment on performance.

    Some basic things to look for with any used ski/skiboard:

    • Avoid major gouges in the bases especially ones that expose the core. Minor gouges can be fixed but will cost a few bucks so figure that in your negotiations.
    • Avoid really rusted edges. Minor surface rust is expected but major rust can prevent you from ever getting a good tune on the edges.
    • Look for and avoid delamination of the layers along edges/sides or deformation in the shape of the board. These may be signs of core damage.
    • Generally look for skiboards that have been well cared for. Ask when they were last waxed and tuned and how much they were ridden. Someone who takes care of the gear means you are less likely to discover problems later or have to invest in major repairs and tuning.


    Here are some good tips to consider too ---> http://www.theskidiva.com/how-to-buy-used-skis/
    Boards:
    2016 Spruce tuned Head Jr. Caddys - 131cm
    2013 Spruce "CTS" 120s
    2010 Spruce "Yellow/Red" 120s
    2018 Spruce "CTS" Crossbows - 115cm
    2016 RVL8 Spliffs - 109cm
    2008 RVL8 Revolt "City" - 105cm
    2017 RVL8 Sticky Icky Icky - 104cm
    2011 Defiance Blades - 101cm
    Reply With Quote  
     

  7. #7  
    CoFounder | Skiboardmagazine.com Roussel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Whistler
    Age
    33
    Posts
    3,113
    Rep Power
    21
    Also, by proper boot fit, i don't mean you need custom expensive boot fit and to spend hours at a shop, just someone who is able to properly size the boot, and know which boots they have in stock which would fit best your particular foot shape.

    If the sales person does not take a look at your feet and just hands you one boot after measuring your foot without any other considertation, I'd look elsewhere. It should take about 45 min to properly find the right boot.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  8. #8  
    Hardcore Skiboarder Wookie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    New Jersey
    Age
    45
    Posts
    2,484
    Rep Power
    12
    Quote Originally Posted by Roussel View Post
    Also, by proper boot fit, i don't mean you need custom expensive boot fit and to spend hours at a shop, just someone who is able to properly size the boot, and know which boots they have in stock which would fit best your particular foot shape......
    Agreed. To clarify my recommendation for SureFoot in NYC the recommendation is not that you need to go to a custom boot fitter and have boots built for you (this is what they primarily do). The recommendation is only that they are the only boot fitter in NYC that I know. NYC is not a hotbed of the ski industry.

    The recommended ski shops I noted will do what Roussel suggests and pair the right manufacturer's boots with your particular feet. You'll know you have right guy when, after they measure and look at your feet, he says "I know brand 'X' would work with your foot shape". If they just ask your shoe size and hand you some boots you have the wrong person ..... run away!

    Last tip, when you head to the ski shop to buy boots bring the socks you will be wearing while you skiboard. These should be thin ski socks not bulky winter socks. One of the biggest mistakes people make is wear bulky or multiple pairs of socks. If the boot guy comments on your socks and grabs you a pair of the rack for the fitting process he is just trying to get you the best fit not up sell you socks too. A boot fitter that makes you change socks is a good sign they know what they are doing too!
    Boards:
    2016 Spruce tuned Head Jr. Caddys - 131cm
    2013 Spruce "CTS" 120s
    2010 Spruce "Yellow/Red" 120s
    2018 Spruce "CTS" Crossbows - 115cm
    2016 RVL8 Spliffs - 109cm
    2008 RVL8 Revolt "City" - 105cm
    2017 RVL8 Sticky Icky Icky - 104cm
    2011 Defiance Blades - 101cm
    Reply With Quote  
     

  9. #9  
    Hardcore Skiboarder Bad Wolf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Maricopa, Arizona
    Age
    56
    Posts
    3,452
    Rep Power
    14
    Quote Originally Posted by kfinn6561 View Post

    I spoke to someone in a ski shop today about boots and he told that I probably want a stiffer boot around the 100flex range.

    However, he only knew about skis, not skiboards!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    , so I wanted to ask on here if there were any special considerations for skiboards. In particular, I've seen in some of the posts that you actually want a more flexible boot for skiboarding. Is this true?
    Less forward lean, less flex, more relaxed fit, more comfort features, less expensive.

    Even if the boot fitter doesn't understand or agree with your choice, he can still make your boots fit better and feel more comfortable.
    Just these, nothing else !

    Reply With Quote  
     

  10. #10  
    TeamRVL8 | DLP Davelynam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Eastern PA
    Age
    30
    Posts
    1,234
    Rep Power
    17
    What size foot are you? Maybe you should ask people on the forums (Hint hint wink wink) if they would be willing to help you out with some of their old equipment because they might be upgrading(COUGH ME COUGH SNEEZE BURP).
    Reply With Quote  
     

  11. #11  
    Hardcore Skiboarder
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Maryland
    Age
    49
    Posts
    858
    Rep Power
    5
    That one is on eBay currently too, I think.

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/272026286146...%3AMEBIDX%3AIT

    I don't know much about it and the bindings that come with it (with the cool-looking crossed V in the center), but they look nice and come with a decent pair of bindings based on reviews of these bindings online that I checked. I think they should work well on firmer groomed surfaces - the ad does not list the dimensions beyond the 99cm length) and they look a bit on the skinny side compared to some other options from Revel8 and others, which are geared to softer conditions and off-piste activities (and which I don't think ride as well in firm on-piste conditions as narrower models, coincidentally).

    The $199 asking price plus shipping is hard to quantify and whether it is a good value or not is in the eye of the beholder, so to speak...

    Titanal is a fancy term for a common aluminum alloy sheet that comes standard on many skis and boards, so nothing exceptional there. EDIT: in these skiboards the whole top sheet seems to be metal (where on most skis/boards, the metal is usually not necessarily covering the entire ski and not necessarily is the top sheet). Whether having a metal top sheet is a plus or a minus I don't know. And I don't know if it is of sufficient thickness and sturdy enough to allow direct-mounted bindings (which you probably don't want on this particular skiboard anyway, but just a consideration).

    Quote Originally Posted by kfinn6561 View Post
    One last question. I'm viewing some LaGriffe Titanal 99cm skiboards tomorrow that I found on craigslist. Is there anything in particular I should be looking for when deciding whether or not to get them? Besides the obvious large scratches and dings etc.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  12. #12  
    Junior Skiboarder
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Location
    Jersey city, NJ
    Age
    28
    Posts
    11
    Rep Power
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Davelynam View Post
    What size foot are you? Maybe you should ask people on the forums (Hint hint wink wink) if they would be willing to help you out with some of their old equipment because they might be upgrading(COUGH ME COUGH SNEEZE BURP).
    Haha, I'm a UK size 8 (US 9). When I tried some boots on the other day the mondo 27.5 fit best.

    I'm not sure about buying boots second hand since all the advice I've got is to get properly fitted, but if you've got some boards to sell I might be able to take them off your hands.

    Quote Originally Posted by Kocho View Post
    That one is on eBay currently too, I think.
    Yes, that looks like the same pair. They look pretty good from the pictures but I'll see what they're like in person in a couple of hours.

    Thanks again for all your help
    Reply With Quote  
     

Tags for this Thread

View Tag Cloud

Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Powered by vBulletin®, Copyright © 2019 vBulletin Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.
Tabs System by vbSoporte - vBulletin en Espaņol