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  1. #76  
    Hardcore Skiboarder Bill's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikeingram71 View Post
    I'm going to purchase a #3 today and will update the thread w/ the results later. It IS both of them.
    Mike, Greco and Jeff gave you good advice. Tightening down any insert mounted bindings is best done like you would tighten the wheel rim on your car, tightening opposing fasteners multiple times, evenly and firmly until they're all equally snug and a #3 Phillips is mandatory for this job on Spruce risers.

    If you STILL get movement, like Bad Wolf mentioned, it must be that the screws are bottoming out in the inserts before getting proper tension on the riser. I've had this happen, and almost every time it's due to some debris trapped inside the insert itself. That's a quick and easy thing to check. If it's not this, there are still easy fixes (shortening screws, chasing insert threads, adding washers, etc.), but I would contact Greco again before tampering with your brand new equipment.
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  2. #77  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill View Post
    Mike, Greco and Jeff gave you good advice. Tightening down any insert mounted bindings is best done like you would tighten the wheel rim on your car, tightening opposing fasteners multiple times, evenly and firmly until they're all equally snug and a #3 Phillips is mandatory for this job on Spruce risers.

    If you STILL get movement, like Bad Wolf mentioned, it must be that the screws are bottoming out in the inserts before getting proper tension on the riser. I've had this happen, and almost every time it's due to some debris trapped inside the insert itself. That's a quick and easy thing to check. If it's not this, there are still easy fixes (shortening screws, chasing insert threads, adding washers, etc.), but I would contact Greco again before tampering with your brand new equipment.
    Bill, your response is incredible and very much appreciated. You just covered ALL the bases. Wish all this advice had come in the package, as I recommended to Greco that he asks Spruce to start doing. I mean I see 4 screws, and I would have felt stupid to ask for advice then. "Uh, you screw the 4 screws in".

    So I just got back with my brand new #3, and that is indeed "key". FIXED. THANKS GENTLEMEN.
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  3. #78 Back on topic sortof 
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    Since I steered the topic off subject, let me steer it back to the boards themselves.

    So how much difference will I notice between the Head 99cm blades I rented yesterday and my Revolts? Night and Day? I can't find out til Feb 4. : (
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  4. #79  
    Hardcore Skiboarder slow's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikeingram71 View Post
    .....................
    So how much difference will I notice between the Head 99cm blades I rented yesterday and my Revolts? Night and Day? I can't find out til Feb 4. : (
    Ten years ago I went from the 98 Head Big Easy to the 105 EMPs. More stability, more speed and more confidence to tackle variable terrain.

    Let us know how it goes for you.


    Osprey, Sherpa, Custom Coda 120WT, Custom DS110, Condor (Green), Spliff

    Custom Twist Out duck foot bindings, Bombers (custom duck foot base plate and 3 pads), releasable S810ti on custom duck foot riser

    Nordica N3 NXT ski boots (best so far)


    Wife: 104 SII & 100 Blunt XL with S810ti bindings on custom "adjustable duck foot" risers

    Loaners: 125LE, 105 EMP, 101 KTP, 100 Blunt XL, 98 Slapdash, 88 Blunts
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  5. #80  
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    Riding my beloved Snowjam Phenom 90's with two different binding setups depending on the mood:

    Groove X1 non-release bindings with ski boots for maximum control and feel of the boards.



    Summit Riser Kit and home-modified Matrix bindings with snowboard boots for flex and comfort.

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  6. #81  
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    question..i currently run Summit headwall 94's...im really interested in getting some new boards this year...ive been intrigued with the blunt xl's and the ktp's..i read the comparason chart and the look very close in performance...soo someone skool me on the rvl8 brand..i ski mainly east coast,Blue mountain,Hunter in upsate ny,with a occasional vermont trip...but head out west for one big trip..soo east its aminly packed powder and ice,but west its mainly groomed and pow..
    ability level-fine with everything,blacks,double blacks,steeps
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  7. #82  
    Hardcore Skiboarder Bad Wolf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by milo View Post
    question..i currently run Summit headwall 94's...im really interested in getting some new boards this year...ive been intrigued with the blunt xl's and the ktp's..i read the comparason chart and the look very close in performance...soo someone skool me on the rvl8 brand..i ski mainly east coast,Blue mountain,Hunter in upsate ny,with a occasional vermont trip...but head out west for one big trip..soo east its aminly packed powder and ice,but west its mainly groomed and pow..
    ability level-fine with everything,blacks,double blacks,steeps
    Although they look fairly similar on the specification table, they ride very differently from each other. The KTPs are stiff with traditional camber, whilst the XLs are rockered and have zero camber underfoot. Buy both, they make a great two board quiver that covers all conditions.
    Just these, nothing else !

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  8. #83  
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    so the camber is to hold a better edge on ice and hard packed...cause to me in the east thats all we have lol..and the rockered are more for the float..soo isnt the spliff's the best of both worlds,just a tad longer
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  9. #84  
    CoFounder | Skiboardmagazine.com Roussel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by milo View Post
    so the camber is to hold a better edge on ice and hard packed...cause to me in the east thats all we have lol..and the rockered are more for the float..soo isnt the spliff's the best of both worlds,just a tad longer
    the spliffs are more like in the middle rather than best of both. I'd say they ride closer to a camber board. Spliffs are def the best all mountain skiboards imo. They favour high level, more aggressive riding. East coast lower level riders might not stand to gain much from them over the Revolts lets say.

    If your shredding east coast i'd go more with the slapdash/revolt/dlp line, or if you absolutely want to go wide go for the ktp/spliff
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  10. #85  
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    Quote Originally Posted by milo View Post
    so the camber is to hold a better edge on ice and hard packed...cause to me in the east thats all we have lol..and the rockered are more for the float..soo isnt the spliff's the best of both worlds,just a tad longer
    For me the preference is camber over rocker for East Coast hardpack but not all riders feel that way. I have ridden with plenty of riders that prefer rockered boards here in the East. It comes down to riding style and preference.

    Quote Originally Posted by Roussel View Post
    the spliffs are more like in the middle rather than best of both. I'd say they ride closer to a camber board. Spliffs are def the best all mountain skiboards imo. They favour high level, more aggressive riding. East coast lower level riders might not stand to gain much from them over the Revolts lets say.

    If your shredding east coast i'd go more with the slapdash/revolt/dlp line, or if you absolutely want to go wide go for the ktp/spliff
    +1 for all of Roussel comments on the Spliffs. It's a subtle difference but to say they are "in the middle" rather than the "best of both" is a good way to discribe them as they have some of the best and not so good characteristics of both. Being not fully rockered they don't float or bust crud a well as full rockered board. Being uber wide and cambered they can be slow edge to edge. The "middle" state is why I think the Spliffs respond well to aggressive riders as you need to push them beyond those middle conditions and then they sing.

    Milo -- if you want to try some things out you should join some of the NJ/PA local riders at Elk Jam next season. We regularly do board demos of each others gear at this meet-up and you could try everything from short rockered Blunt XLs to Skis.
    Boards:
    2016 Spruce tuned Head Jr. Caddys - 131cm
    2013 Spruce "CTS" 120s
    2010 Spruce "Yellow/Red" 120s
    2018 Spruce "CTS" Crossbows - 115cm
    2016 RVL8 Spliffs - 109cm
    2008 RVL8 Revolt "City" - 105cm
    2017 RVL8 Sticky Icky Icky - 104cm
    2011 Defiance Blades - 101cm
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  11. #86  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wookie View Post
    For me the preference is camber over rocker for East Coast hardpack but not all riders feel that way. I have ridden with plenty of riders that prefer rockered boards here in the East. It comes down to riding style and preference.



    +1 for all of Roussel comments on the Spliffs. It's a subtle difference but to say they are "in the middle" rather than the "best of both" is a good way to discribe them as they have some of the best and not so good characteristics of both. Being not fully rockered they don't float or bust crud a well as full rockered board. Being uber wide and cambered they can be slow edge to edge. The "middle" state is why I think the Spliffs respond well to aggressive riders as you need to push them beyond those middle conditions and then they sing.

    Milo -- if you want to try some things out you should join some of the NJ/PA local riders at Elk Jam next season. We regularly do board demos of each others gear at this meet-up and you could try everything from short rockered Blunt XLs to Skis.
    im down for that..only been to elk like 3 times..its a bit further west than blue..but im deff down..going have to think about something though...me and my friends are already talking about next years trip(we take a big trip out west every year)..last year we did brekenridge and keystone...whistler got thrown into the talks for this year...i dont think my summet 94's are built for that
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  12. #87  
    Hardcore Skiboarder Bad Wolf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by milo View Post
    ..me and my friends are already talking about next years trip(we take a big trip out west every year)..last year we did brekenridge and keystone...whistler got thrown into the talks for this year...i dont think my summet 94's are built for that
    It takes a very versatile skiboarder to make one style of board work in a variety of conditions. I think for most of us, riding a traditionally cambered skiboard in powder is the greatest challenge. With sharp edges, your Summits should be great for the East coast conditions, but you really need some width and rocker to handle what the West has to offer. If you have a trip planned to a place like Whistler, I would consider the Blunt XLs. They seem to have become the go to board for many riders who want to cover a variety of conditions.
    Just these, nothing else !

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  13. #88  
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    Quote Originally Posted by milo View Post
    im down for that..only been to elk like 3 times..its a bit further west than blue..but im deff down..going have to think about something though...me and my friends are already talking about next years trip(we take a big trip out west every year)..last year we did brekenridge and keystone...whistler got thrown into the talks for this year...i dont think my summet 94's are built for that
    If you can join us at Elk that would be awesome. During most of the season I ride at Jack Frost or Big Boulder (mostly to avoid the crowds at Blue and Camelback) so if you want to connect to demo some boards drop me a PM when the snow starts falling and I can swing over to Blue.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bad Wolf View Post
    It takes a very versatile skiboarder to make one style of board work in a variety of conditions. I think for most of us, riding a traditionally cambered skiboard in powder is the greatest challenge. With sharp edges, your Summits should be great for the East coast conditions, but you really need some width and rocker to handle what the West has to offer. If you have a trip planned to a place like Whistler, I would consider the Blunt XLs. They seem to have become the go to board for many riders who want to cover a variety of conditions.
    Bad Wolf is right. It's rare to find one board that works in every conditions. Most of us pick a board that works in our home conditions and deal with it or build a quiver of boards that we can draw from depending on the snow. Long Skis are no different ... the all condition, all mountain ski is a myth.

    For Whistler you have a bit of a conundrum. While it is West Coast skiing (big mountain, more snow) the snow can and cannot be West Coast powder. Given it's location sometimes you get nice dry powder which is like skiing in Utah and sometimes you get coastal driven storms that drop wet heavy snow that reminds you of the East Coast (granted it's the best East Coast snow we ever get). If you get the dry fluffy stuff you are going to need something wider and with some rocker. If you get the wet heavy stuff and it packs up hard you'll be longing for your Summits. I think Bad Wolf makes a good suggestion about going for the Blunt XLs. Many East Coast riders use them as their board of choice. They are great crud busters for our warmer spring days but transition well to conditions out west. In the pantheon of rockered boards they are very easy to get along with. Their larger cousin, the Rockered Condors, take some effort to learn and require a very centered riding stance. The Blunt XLs are more forgiving but still give you the perks of a rocker board. Going from the Summits to the these you may marvel at how wide they are but after 2-3 runs you'll be right at home. Grab a set, pack them in a bag with your Summits, and one pair of bindings and you'll have a little mini quiver that will cover you anywhere you go.
    Boards:
    2016 Spruce tuned Head Jr. Caddys - 131cm
    2013 Spruce "CTS" 120s
    2010 Spruce "Yellow/Red" 120s
    2018 Spruce "CTS" Crossbows - 115cm
    2016 RVL8 Spliffs - 109cm
    2008 RVL8 Revolt "City" - 105cm
    2017 RVL8 Sticky Icky Icky - 104cm
    2011 Defiance Blades - 101cm
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  14. #89  
    Hardcore Skiboarder macrophotog's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bad Wolf View Post
    . . .I would consider the Blunt XLs. They seem to have become the go to board for many riders who want to cover a variety of conditions.
    +1 for the BluntXL

    I ride quite a few different boards here in the east (home mountain is Elk), and personally prefer rockered boards or softer flex cambered boards for my style of riding and our typical conditions. Some don't like rockered boards for east coast ice, but I actually prefer them over cambered boards like the Revolts, DLP's, KTP's, Slapdashes, etc. In fact after riding the KTP's almost exclusively for a season and then the XL's the following season I decided to sell the KTP's in favor of the XL's. The bonus is that the XL's also perform tremendously in powder as many of our west coasters attest to.

    As Wookie mentioned, the best thing is to meet up with a couple of us to try different boards out. Once the season gets going, I'm at Elk pretty much every Friday and Saturday and could set you up with several to demo.
    Boards / Skis
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    Armada - Triple J 155
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    (previous: RVL8 - Revolt, KTP, DLP, Blunt, Rockered Condor, and BWP. Spruce - 120 and Osprey. Head Salamander 94, Caddy 131 & 151, and Ethan Too 161. Atomic - 1:20, Access 151, and Punx III 140. Summit Invertigo, Hagan OffLimit)
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  15. #90  
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    Quote Originally Posted by macrophotog View Post
    +1 for the BluntXL

    I ride quite a few different boards here in the east (home mountain is Elk), and personally prefer rockered boards or softer flex cambered boards for my style of riding and our typical conditions. Some don't like rockered boards for east coast ice, but I actually prefer them over cambered boards like the Revolts, DLP's, KTP's, Slapdashes, etc. In fact after riding the KTP's almost exclusively for a season and then the XL's the following season I decided to sell the KTP's in favor of the XL's. The bonus is that the XL's also perform tremendously in powder as many of our west coasters attest to.

    As Wookie mentioned, the best thing is to meet up with a couple of us to try different boards out. Once the season gets going, I'm at Elk pretty much every Friday and Saturday and could set you up with several to demo.
    ...
    im deff down for that..im off fri and sat also...my summet headwall 94's are proll cloese to your head 94's.they deff have a camber cause they dont lie complety flat next to each other.i have no issues with them.going down blacks,double black...even in breckenridge while on the imperial lift..i had a skier say..hey you got allot of balls going up there with those shorts...i said as long as there powder im fine cause i can cut easy..one thing im bummed at they have the dreaded drilled in binding with no 4 hole patteren...and i learned that that is a no no....but as soon as the snow starts falling ill be there...
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