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Backwards woes.

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  • kirk
    replied
    Originally posted by bhd1223 View Post
    Thanks Kirk. I guess more practice it will be. I'll have to focus on trying to stay flatter on the boards. I have some KTPs coming in soon to demo. When do you recommend using the back set of holes for bindings? Only for deep powder?
    Yeah, I'd definitely only use the setbacks for powder. They are awesome for powder, but they make carving on non-powder feel strange and make you less stable in the park.

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  • bhd1223
    replied
    Thanks Kirk. I guess more practice it will be. I'll have to focus on trying to stay flatter on the boards. I have some KTPs coming in soon to demo. When do you recommend using the back set of holes for bindings? Only for deep powder?

    Leave a comment:


  • kirk
    replied
    Dave had the main thing covered which is knowing the shoulder you look over and leading with that foot. The rest is really just doing that enough to become comfortable with it. The hardest thing is getting both feet to consistently ride in a straight line while your body is twisted looking over your shoulder. This will take a while, and the only way to figure it out is by doing it over and over. If you skate, you can practice it on skates, since this is the exact same technique; otherwise, you have to learn on the snow. Just keep riding entire trails backwards. Start with easy slopes, and progress once you are comfortable.

    You can experiment in regular shoes. Turn around and pretend your are riding backwards down the hill with one of your feet leading the way. Now take a look at your two feet. Chances are that they are not perfectly flat on the ground and parallel to each other. They need to be flat and completely parallel to be able to ride backwards in control. When you are riding backwards, your skiboards kind of act as one unit, so they have to be doing the exact same thing. The spread in your legs actually gives you extra suspension that you don't have riding forwards, so park riders actually find it easier to land backwards.

    No quick tricks on this one... just keep riding backwards as much as possible!

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  • kirk
    replied
    Originally posted by slow View Post
    I noticed that some riders look under their arm pit while others look over their shoulder. What are the pros and cons of each technique?
    I've noticed this too. Most people that skate tend to look over the shoulder, and I tend to see skiers looking under the arm more often. I definitely have the over the shoulder style from my skating background. I find looking over the shoulder to make you more maneuverable, but your body is more torqued, so you have to be comfortable with that position. When you look under the arm you are relying on your tips for more support but your body is less torqued so it is probably somewhat easier to learn.

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  • slow
    replied
    I noticed that some riders look under their arm pit while others look over their shoulder. What are the pros and cons of each technique?

    Leave a comment:


  • Bad Wolf
    replied
    Originally posted by bhd1223 View Post
    Thanks Dave. I am looking over the shoulder of the leading foot. I find that as I try to see what's behind me with this method I get that sharp cut or carve which stops me. This is what makes me wonder if it's a matter of flexibility. Perhaps to get my head far enough around I end up hard on the edges?
    I have this problem too. It is hard to turn your upper body without affecting the lower, especially going backwards. Takes practice and patience.

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  • bhd1223
    replied
    Thanks Dave. I am looking over the shoulder of the leading foot. I find that as I try to see what's behind me with this method I get that sharp cut or carve which stops me. This is what makes me wonder if it's a matter of flexibility. Perhaps to get my head far enough around I end up hard on the edges?

    Leave a comment:


  • Davelynam
    replied
    which ever shoulder you are looking over, should be the foot you are leading with. So if youre looking over your right shoulder, your right foot should be out in front. Dont over exaggerate the scissoring of your legs, but put in enough separation to keep control . start off by becoming comfortable with just looking over one shoulder. Im sure Kirk will chime in soon and give you a three pager that is much better than my recommendation. He is by far the best at explaining the "how to" stuff.

    Leave a comment:


  • bhd1223
    started a topic Backwards woes.

    Backwards woes.

    Hello all,

    I'd still consider myself a beginner and new to skiboards as I only have about 5 or 6 days between last year and this year on a set of Slapdashes. Being very comfortable going forwards and carving I started trying backwards on my last day out. I'm comfortable going off small jumps and before I venture into the terrain park to progress I'd like to be decently comfortable going backwards. I can wedge just fine but carving/turning gives me issues.

    When I manage to get going backwards and start to turn I just cut a sharp turn to stopping. I can't seem to carry downhill without wedging. Perhaps it's a matter of flexibility? Transitioning side to side is also difficult but that may be due to the sharp cut that happens where I can't get going with any speed. I find myself almost fully extended regarding leg positioning and somewhat heavy on the toes with the downhill board. Perhaps this is part of my problem? I've watched a lot of videos of "how to ski backwards" and even viewed some of Kirk's videos watching him move backwards. It looks effortless. If only it was. I'm basically trying to mimic what I see in all these videos. So far not a ton of luck but it could be worse.

    Anyone care to critique or provide some advice? I'll have to make it a point to get out with some more experienced folks this year. Starting at the end of last season didn't lead to much opportunity in that regard. Also, I plan on picking up some KTPs soon to try out some wider boards. Maybe it's easier on a wider board?

    Thanks,
    Brian
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